Molecular cloning, characterization, and differential expression pattern of mouse lung surfactant convertase

S. Krishnasamy, A. L. Teng, Rajiv Dhand, R. M. Schultz, N. J. Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We recently reported the purification and partial amino acid sequence of 'surfactant convertase,' a 72-kDa glycoprotein involved in the extracellular metabolism of lung surfactant (S. Krishnasamy, N.J. Gross, A. L. Teng, R. M. Schultz, and R. Dhand. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 235: 180-184, 1997). We report here the isolation of a cDNA clone encoding putative convertase from a mouse lung cDNA library. The cDNA spans a 1,836-bp sequence, with an open reading frame encoding 536 amino acid residues in the mature protein and an 18-amino acid signal peptide at the NH 2 terminus. The deduced amino acid sequence matches the four partial amino acid sequences (68 residues) that were previously obtained from the purified protein. The deduced amino acid sequence contains an 18-amino acid residue signal peptide, a serine active site consensus sequence, a histidine consensus sequence, five potential N- linked glycosylation sites, and a COOH-terminal secretory-type sequence His- Thr-Glu-His-Lys. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 nucleotides upstream from the start codon. Northern blot analysis of RNA isolated from various mouse organs showed that convertase is expressed in lung, kidney, and liver as a 1,800-nucleotide-long transcript. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of putative convertase are 98% homologous with mouse liver carboxylesterase. It thus may be the first member of the carboxylesterase family (EC 3.1.1.1) to be expressed in lung parenchyma and the first with a known physiological function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Volume275
Issue number5 19-5
StatePublished - Dec 7 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Molecular Cloning
Surface-Active Agents
Amino Acid Sequence
Lung
Carboxylesterase
Nucleotides
Consensus Sequence
Protein Sorting Signals
Amino Acids
Complementary DNA
Initiator Codon
Liver
Gene Library
Glycosylation
Histidine
Northern Blotting
Serine
Open Reading Frames
Catalytic Domain
Glycoproteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Molecular cloning, characterization, and differential expression pattern of mouse lung surfactant convertase. / Krishnasamy, S.; Teng, A. L.; Dhand, Rajiv; Schultz, R. M.; Gross, N. J.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Vol. 275, No. 5 19-5, 07.12.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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