Molecular mimicry in neurological disease

What is the evidence?

Sang Lee, M. C. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autoimmune diseases are a leading cause of disability and are increasing in incidence in industrialized countries. How people develop autoimmune diseases is not completely understood, but is related to an interaction between genetic background, environmental agents, autoantigens and the immune response. Molecular mimicry continues to be an important hypothesis that explains how an infection with an environmental agent results in autoimmune disease of the nervous system and other target organs. Although molecular mimicry has yet to be unequivocally proven, in the past several years there has been a sharpening of its definition with better experimental data implicating it as a cause of neurological disease in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1175
Number of pages15
JournalCellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Volume65
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

Fingerprint

Molecular Mimicry
Autoimmune Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
Autoantigens
Developed Countries
Incidence
Infection
Genetic Background

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Molecular mimicry in neurological disease : What is the evidence? / Lee, Sang; Levin, M. C.

In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, Vol. 65, No. 7-8, 01.04.2008, p. 1161-1175.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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