Molecular techniques for identifying HCC origin and biology after orthotopic liver transplantation

Valeria Mas, Daniel Maluf, Catherine I. Dumur, Kellie J. Archer, Kenneth Yanek, Colleen Jackson-Cook, Robert A. Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. Liver transplantation represents the potentially curative treatment for small HCC. Recurrence after surgical resection and liver transplantation remains one of the major obstacles in further prolonging survival of patients with HCC. In the new liver, HCC might be of recipient or donor origin. One approach for investigating this question is by performing human identification and/or engraftment analysis. Distinction between recurrent and de novo HCC after orthotopic liver transplantation could allow for the development of important clinical and therapeutic strategies. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat DNA sequences, gene expression profiling, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were applied in a patient who developed a second HCC after orthotopic liver transplantation from an opposite gender donor. These techniques provided consistent evidence that the second HCC was a recurrence of the primary tumor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-94
Number of pages5
JournalDiagnostic Molecular Pathology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Liver Transplantation
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Tissue Donors
Recurrence
Forensic Anthropology
Tandem Repeat Sequences
Gene Expression Profiling
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Microsatellite Repeats
Neoplasms
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Survival
Liver
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Molecular techniques for identifying HCC origin and biology after orthotopic liver transplantation. / Mas, Valeria; Maluf, Daniel; Dumur, Catherine I.; Archer, Kellie J.; Yanek, Kenneth; Jackson-Cook, Colleen; Fisher, Robert A.

In: Diagnostic Molecular Pathology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.06.2006, p. 90-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mas, Valeria ; Maluf, Daniel ; Dumur, Catherine I. ; Archer, Kellie J. ; Yanek, Kenneth ; Jackson-Cook, Colleen ; Fisher, Robert A. / Molecular techniques for identifying HCC origin and biology after orthotopic liver transplantation. In: Diagnostic Molecular Pathology. 2006 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 90-94.
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