MOMS

Formative evaluation and subsequent intervention for mothers living with HIV

Susan L. Davies, Trudi V. Horton, Angela G. Williams, Michelle Martin, Katharine E. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Making Our Mothers Stronger (MOMS) Project is a randomized controlled behavioral trial, comparing a stress-reduction and social support intervention (Healthy MOMS) to a parenting skills intervention (Parenting Skills for MOMS) for mothers living with HIV. Outcomes include maternal mental and physical health, parenting behaviors, and children's behavior. To ensure that these interventions were tailored to the needs of HIV + mothers, extensive formative work was conducted with members of the intended audience and relevant service providers. Findings from focus groups and semi-structured interviews highlighted the need for Healthy MOMS to: (1) include appropriate approaches to group discussion and problem solving; (2) address the stressors of being both a parent and a woman living with HIV; and (3) enhance social support. Six weekly group sessions focused on topics including coping with stress and anxiety; enhancing nutrition, exercise, and sexual health; improving medical adherence; improving communication with health care providers; and communicating health needs to family, friends, and co-workers. Initial anecdotal responses from participants suggest that the Healthy MOMS intervention addresses several salient issues for the growing population of HIV + mothers who can benefit from long-term support in adapting to this chronic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-560
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Fingerprint

Mothers
HIV
evaluation
Parenting
Social Support
social support
health
co-worker
Reproductive Health
Child Behavior
Focus Groups
Health Personnel
group discussion
service provider
nutrition
Healthy Volunteers
Mental Health
coping
parents
Chronic Disease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

MOMS : Formative evaluation and subsequent intervention for mothers living with HIV. / Davies, Susan L.; Horton, Trudi V.; Williams, Angela G.; Martin, Michelle; Stewart, Katharine E.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.05.2009, p. 552-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davies, Susan L. ; Horton, Trudi V. ; Williams, Angela G. ; Martin, Michelle ; Stewart, Katharine E. / MOMS : Formative evaluation and subsequent intervention for mothers living with HIV. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 552-560.
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