Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

M. Tamaddon, M. Burrows, S. A. Ferreira, F. Dazzi, J. F. Apperley, A. Bradshaw, David Brand, J. Czernuszka, E. Gentleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number43519
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2017

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Collagen Type II
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Chondroitin Sulfates
Bone Marrow
Osteoarthritis
Collagen Type I
Fibrillar Collagens
Phenotype
Aptitude
Articular Cartilage
Tissue Engineering
Cell Differentiation
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Stem Cells
Joints
Gene Expression
Pain
In Vitro Techniques
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Tamaddon, M., Burrows, M., Ferreira, S. A., Dazzi, F., Apperley, J. F., Bradshaw, A., ... Gentleman, E. (2017). Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. Scientific reports, 7, [43519]. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep43519

Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. / Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, David; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 7, 43519, 03.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tamaddon, M, Burrows, M, Ferreira, SA, Dazzi, F, Apperley, JF, Bradshaw, A, Brand, D, Czernuszka, J & Gentleman, E 2017, 'Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro', Scientific reports, vol. 7, 43519. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep43519
Tamaddon, M. ; Burrows, M. ; Ferreira, S. A. ; Dazzi, F. ; Apperley, J. F. ; Bradshaw, A. ; Brand, David ; Czernuszka, J. ; Gentleman, E. / Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. In: Scientific reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7.
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