Morbid obesity and nutrition support

Is bigger different?

Patricia S. Choban, Roland Dickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Morbid obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m 2 or >35 kg/m 2 in the presence of an severe-obesity-related comorbid disease) is increasing in frequency in the United States and worldwide. This population has a variety of medical and surgical disorders that result in hospitalizations. It is not unexpected to encounter these patients on the nutrition support service. The obesity comorbid diseases that may increase complications related to nutrition support are present in greater frequency and severity in the morbidly obese population than in the nonobese population. To reduce these potential complications, strategies of hypocaloric nutrition have been advocated for obese patients, and this study focuses specifically on the morbidly obese subset.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-487
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition in Clinical Practice
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

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Morbid Obesity
Population
Hospitalization
Body Mass Index
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Morbid obesity and nutrition support : Is bigger different? / Choban, Patricia S.; Dickerson, Roland.

In: Nutrition in Clinical Practice, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 480-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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