Multidimensional HRMAS NMR

A platform for in vivo studies using intact bacterial cells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In vivo analysis in whole cell bacteria, especially the native tertiary structures of the bacterial cell wall, remains an unconquered frontier. The current understanding of bacterial cell wall structures has been based on destructive analysis of individual components. These in vitro results may not faithfully reflect the native structural and conformational information. Multidimensional High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR (HRMAS NMR) has evolved to be a powerful technique in a variety of in vivo studies, including live bacterial cells. Existing studies of HRMAS NMR in bacteria, technical consideration of its successful application, and current limitations in studying true human pathogens are briefly reviewed in this report.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)777-781
Number of pages5
JournalAnalyst
Volume131
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 4 2006

Fingerprint

Magic angle spinning
Cell Wall
nuclear magnetic resonance
Bacteria
Cells
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Bacterial Structures
bacterium
Pathogens
pathogen
analysis
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Multidimensional HRMAS NMR : A platform for in vivo studies using intact bacterial cells. / Li, Wei.

In: Analyst, Vol. 131, No. 7, 04.07.2006, p. 777-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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