Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever

S. K. Kabra, Madhulika, Ajay Talati, N. Soni, S. Patel, R. R. Modi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One hundred children (consecutive) with positive blood culture for Salmonella typhi were studied for clinical profile and complications. The common clinical features were fever (100%), vomiting (58%), abdominal pain (48%), cough (22%) and loose stools (14%) and the Widal test was positive in 75% patients. Eighty per cent of the salmonella isolates were resistant to amoxycillin, chloramphenicol and co-trimoxazole drugs, but all were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone. Forty patients developed complications: encephalopathy (18), melaena (12), haematemesis (10), epistaxis (4), hepatitis (4), acalculous cholecystitis (4), bowel perforation (3) and nephritis (2). Complications were more frequent in children with multidrug-resistant typhoid. The final antibiotic required to render the children afebrile included ciprofloxacin (80), ceftriaxone, amoxycillin (4), chloramphenicol (4), amoxycillin and gentamicin (4), amoxycillin with chloramphenicol (2), and furazolidone (2). The defervesence time was least with ceftriaxone and greatest with amoxycillin. All the affected children made a complete recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-197
Number of pages3
JournalTropical Doctor
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Typhoid Fever
Amoxicillin
Ceftriaxone
Chloramphenicol
Ciprofloxacin
Acalculous Cholecystitis
Furazolidone
Melena
Hematemesis
Salmonella typhi
Epistaxis
Nephritis
Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination Trimethoprim
Brain Diseases
Gentamicins
Cough
Salmonella
Abdominal Pain
Hepatitis
Vomiting

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Kabra, S. K., Madhulika, Talati, A., Soni, N., Patel, S., & Modi, R. R. (2000). Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever. Tropical Doctor, 30(4), 195-197. https://doi.org/10.1177/004947550003000404

Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever. / Kabra, S. K.; Madhulika, ; Talati, Ajay; Soni, N.; Patel, S.; Modi, R. R.

In: Tropical Doctor, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 195-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kabra, SK, Madhulika, , Talati, A, Soni, N, Patel, S & Modi, RR 2000, 'Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever', Tropical Doctor, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 195-197. https://doi.org/10.1177/004947550003000404
Kabra SK, Madhulika , Talati A, Soni N, Patel S, Modi RR. Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever. Tropical Doctor. 2000 Jan 1;30(4):195-197. https://doi.org/10.1177/004947550003000404
Kabra, S. K. ; Madhulika, ; Talati, Ajay ; Soni, N. ; Patel, S. ; Modi, R. R. / Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever. In: Tropical Doctor. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 195-197.
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