Multiple drug targets in the management of type 2 diabetes

M. H. Moneva, Samuel Dagogo-Jack

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is being diagnosed at an alarming rate around the world. More than 90% of the estimated 200 million affected persons with diabetes worldwide have type 2 DM, an often clinically silent disorder. In the United States, nearly half of the estimated 16 million persons with diabetes remain undiagnosed. Type 2 diabetes is preceded by a long period of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), a potentially reversible metabolic state associated with increased risk for macrovascular complications. At the time of diagnosis more than one-third of patients have already developed long-term complications of diabetes. Genetic and acquired factors contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The pathophysiological hallmarks consist of progressive insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, and excessive hepatic glucose production. The ideal treatment for type 2 diabetes should correct insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and normalize hepatic glucose output, as well as prevent, delay, or reverse diabetic complications. Emerging targets for therapy of type 2 diabetes include inhibition of gluconeogenesis, lipolysis, and fatty acid oxidation, as well as stimulation of β3-adrenergic receptors. Drug intervention for obesity is a legitimate adjunct to diabetes management. Additional drug targets include interventions to prevent or delay the progression of specific complications. Finally, primary prevention of type 2 diabetes is an important emerging strategy. The specific pharmacological agents acting at the various targets are discussed in this review. A targeted approach to the multiple underlying pathophysiologic processes offers the best chance of controlling diabetes and complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-221
Number of pages19
JournalCurrent Drug Targets
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2002

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Medical problems
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Complications
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Insulin Resistance
Glucose
Glucose Intolerance
Gluconeogenesis
Lipolysis
Liver
Primary Prevention
Adrenergic Receptors
Diabetes Mellitus
Fatty Acids
Obesity
Pharmacology
Insulin
Therapeutics
Oxidation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Multiple drug targets in the management of type 2 diabetes. / Moneva, M. H.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel.

In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 3, No. 3, 05.06.2002, p. 203-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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