Multiple opioid receptors on immune cells modulate intracellular signaling

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1979, Joseph Wybran reported his insights into the existence of different opioid receptor subtypes on T-cells. He observed that morphine and methionine enkephalin had different effects on human T-cell rosetting to sheep red blood cells. Since that time, a wide array of laboratories have shown that opiate alkyloids and opioid peptides exert pleiotropic effects on immune cell function. These compounds are immunomodulators, modifying immune responses to extracellular stimuli such as mitogens, antigens, and antibodies that cross-link the T-cell receptor. It has been demonstrated that cells involved in host defense and immunity express mRNA transcripts encoding the various opioid receptors originally described in neuronal tissues. Molecular imaging approaches have demonstrated the regulated expression of both δ and κ opioid receptors, predominantly on T-cells. Moreover, atypical opiate and opioid binding sites are present on these cells. This review will consider the evidence for both classical and atypical opioid receptors and their effects on signaling within immune cells; our emphasis is the T-cell and its δ opioid receptor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages6
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Opioid Receptors
T-Lymphocytes
Opioid Peptides
Opiate Alkaloids
Methionine Enkephalin
Molecular Imaging
Immunologic Factors
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Mitogens
Morphine
Opioid Analgesics
Immunity
Sheep
Erythrocytes
Binding Sites
Antigens
Messenger RNA
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Multiple opioid receptors on immune cells modulate intracellular signaling. / Sharp, Burt.

In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 9-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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