Muscle fiber orientation and connective tissue content in the hypertrophied human heart

E. S. Pearlman, Karl Weber, J. S. Janicki, G. G. Pietra, A. P. Fishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

188 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To elucidate the structural correlates of cardiac failure in myocardial tissue, muscle fiber alignment and connective tissue volume fraction were measured at multiple sites in the left ventricular free wall and in the interventricular septum of 14 human hearts. Group 1 (five hearts; 280 ± 20 gm.) had no evidence of cardiac disease, group 2 (five hearts; 380 ± 30 gm.) had a history of systemic hypertension without clinical heart failure, and group 3 (four hearts; 590 ± 40 gm.) had both left ventricular overload and congestive failure. Fiber orientations were determined by measuring fiber angle relative to the circumferential direction (helix angle). The fraction of the myocardial volume occupied by connective tissue was determined by point counting. Our results indicate a smooth transition of helix angle from epi- to endocardial surface in the normal left ventricular free wall with nearly 55 per cent of the wall occupied by circumferentially oriented fibers near the cardiac equator (latitude of largest ventricular diameter); morphologically, the interventricular septum was nearly identical with the free wall. Fiber alignment was maintained in all three groups as was the fraction of wall occupied by circumferential fibers. Connective tissue volume fraction was, however, significantly increased (p<0.02) in hypertrophied hearts (groups 2 and 3) as compared with normal hearts, and at two of six sites in clinically failed hearts as compared with hypertrophied but functionally compensated hearts. Thus, muscle fiber orientation is not altered in the hypertrophied pressure-overloaded left ventricle, whereas connective tissue content is increased with the increase being greatest in the failing heart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-164
Number of pages7
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume46
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Connective Tissue
Muscles
Heart Failure
Heart Ventricles
Heart Diseases
Hypertension
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Pearlman, E. S., Weber, K., Janicki, J. S., Pietra, G. G., & Fishman, A. P. (1982). Muscle fiber orientation and connective tissue content in the hypertrophied human heart. Laboratory Investigation, 46(2), 158-164.

Muscle fiber orientation and connective tissue content in the hypertrophied human heart. / Pearlman, E. S.; Weber, Karl; Janicki, J. S.; Pietra, G. G.; Fishman, A. P.

In: Laboratory Investigation, Vol. 46, No. 2, 1982, p. 158-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pearlman, ES, Weber, K, Janicki, JS, Pietra, GG & Fishman, AP 1982, 'Muscle fiber orientation and connective tissue content in the hypertrophied human heart', Laboratory Investigation, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 158-164.
Pearlman, E. S. ; Weber, Karl ; Janicki, J. S. ; Pietra, G. G. ; Fishman, A. P. / Muscle fiber orientation and connective tissue content in the hypertrophied human heart. In: Laboratory Investigation. 1982 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 158-164.
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