Muscle torque in young and older untrained and endurance-trained men

Stephen Alway, Andrew R. Coggan, Margaret S. Sproul, Amir M. Abduljalil, Pierre Marie Robitaille

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plantar flexor torque was measured in 24 young (25 ± 1.4 y) and older (62 ± 2 y) untrained and endurance-trained men to test the hypothesis that age- associated declines in muscle.function would be attenuated in older men who also endurance trained. Endurance-trained subjects averaged 7-9 h/wk of aerobic activity for 10-12 years. These subjects had not engaged in resistance training previously in the past 10 years. Plantar flexor torque was measured at velocities between 0 and 5.23 rads · s-1. In absolute terms, maximal isometric torque was 23% lower in older men compared to young men, regardless of their training status. On the other hand, relative measures of isometric strength (i.e., torque muscle cross-sectional area- 1 and torque · muscle volume-1) were similar in young and older men but were higher in trained than in untrained men. Isokinetic torque · muscle cross-sectional area-1 and torque · muscle volume-1 was greater at contraction velocities of 0.26-2.09 rads · s-1 for trained subjects. These data suggest that endurance training does not attenuate the age-associated loss of muscle mass or absolute strength. However, endurance training might reduce the extent of lass of relative strength because torque muscle cross- sectional area-1 and torque · muscle volume-1 are greater in endurance- trained older men than in untrained older men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Torque
Muscles
Resistance Training

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Muscle torque in young and older untrained and endurance-trained men. / Alway, Stephen; Coggan, Andrew R.; Sproul, Margaret S.; Abduljalil, Amir M.; Robitaille, Pierre Marie.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.01.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alway, Stephen ; Coggan, Andrew R. ; Sproul, Margaret S. ; Abduljalil, Amir M. ; Robitaille, Pierre Marie. / Muscle torque in young and older untrained and endurance-trained men. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 1996 ; Vol. 51, No. 3.
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