Myonecrosis of the rectus muscle after a Cherney incision

Andrea M. Ries, Lawrence R. Nycum, Mark Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The original description of the Cherney incision includes bilateral ligation of the inferior epigastric vessels to increase incision width [1]. However, in patients with compromised abdominal wall vasculature, ligation may lead to healing complications. Case. Our patient experienced necrosis of the right rectus muscle after undergoing pelvic surgery via a Cherney incision. During the procedure, attempts were made to retain both inferior epigastric arteries, but the right was transected and ligated. Sepsis developed and myofascitis was diagnosed. The interesting radiographic findings of myofascitis are also presented. Conclusion. The vasculature of our patient's abdominal wall may have been compromised after four previous transverse abdominal incisions, and the ligation of the right inferior epigastric vessel may have contributed to postoperative complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-68
Number of pages3
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Ligation
Abdominal Wall
Muscles
Epigastric Arteries
Abdominal Muscles
Sepsis
Necrosis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Myonecrosis of the rectus muscle after a Cherney incision. / Ries, Andrea M.; Nycum, Lawrence R.; Reed, Mark.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 68, No. 1, 01.01.1998, p. 66-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ries, Andrea M. ; Nycum, Lawrence R. ; Reed, Mark. / Myonecrosis of the rectus muscle after a Cherney incision. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 1998 ; Vol. 68, No. 1. pp. 66-68.
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