Myostatin gene expression is reduced in humans with heavy-resistance strength training

A brief communication

Stephen M. Roth, Gregory F. Martel, Robert E. Ferrell, E. Metter, Ben F. Hurley, Marc A. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined changes in myostatin gene expression in response to strength training (ST). Fifteen young and older men (n = 7) and women (n = 8) completed a 9-week heavy-resistance unilateral knee extension ST program. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the dominant vastus lateralis before and after ST. In addition to myostatin mRNA levels, muscle volume and strength were measured. Total RNA was reverse transcribed into cDNA, and myostatin mRNA was quantified using quantitative PCR by standard fluorescent chemistries and was normalized to 18S rRNA levels. A 37% decrease in myostatin expression was observed in response to ST in all subjects combined (2.70 ± 0.36 vs 1.69 ± 0.18 U, arbitrary units; P < 0.05). Though the decline in myostatin expression was similar regardless of age or gender, the small number of subjects in these subgroups suggests that this observation needs to be confirmed. No significant correlations were observed between myostatin expression and any muscle strength or volume measure. Although further work is necessary to clarify the findings, these data demonstrate that myostatin mRNA levels are reduced in response to heavy-resistance ST in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)706-709
Number of pages4
JournalExperimental Biology and Medicine
Volume228
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Myostatin
Resistance Training
Gene expression
Communication
Gene Expression
Muscle
Muscle Strength
Messenger RNA
Biopsy
Quadriceps Muscle
Knee
Complementary DNA
RNA
Education
Muscles
Polymerase Chain Reaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Myostatin gene expression is reduced in humans with heavy-resistance strength training : A brief communication. / Roth, Stephen M.; Martel, Gregory F.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Metter, E.; Hurley, Ben F.; Rogers, Marc A.

In: Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 228, No. 6, 01.01.2003, p. 706-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roth, Stephen M. ; Martel, Gregory F. ; Ferrell, Robert E. ; Metter, E. ; Hurley, Ben F. ; Rogers, Marc A. / Myostatin gene expression is reduced in humans with heavy-resistance strength training : A brief communication. In: Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 228, No. 6. pp. 706-709.
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