Nasal quantities of respirator; syncytial virus in hospitalized infants with and without respiratory failure

S. C. Buckingham, John Devincenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. This study intended to evaluate the relationship between nasal virus quantity and disease severity in hospitalized, RSV-infected infants without underlying respiratory disease. During the winter of 1997, freshly-obtained nasal washings from 25 infants hospitalized with RSV infection (11 with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and 14 managed without mechanical ventilation) were inoculated for plaque assay on Hep-2 cells. One sample in the non-ventilated group had to be excluded due to bacterial overgrowth. Ventilated Non-ventilated P n 11 13 - Age, days a 174±217 94±61 >0.2 b M:F ratio 7:4 5:8 >0.2 c Duration of sxs, d, a 5.2±2.7 4.5±1 >0.2 b Premaure <37 wk. 9 4 <0.025 c geometric mean RSV titer, log (pfu/mL) a 5.3±0.8 3.9±2.4 0.258 d amean±standard deviation bStudent's t-test cChi-square test d Wikoxon Rank-Sum test Among infants without underlying respiratory disease who are hospitalized for RSV infection, there appears to be little difference in nasal RSV quantity between infants with respiratory failure and those hospitalized with less severe disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376
Number of pages1
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume25
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997

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Mechanical Ventilators
Nose
Respiratory Insufficiency
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Viruses
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Artificial Respiration
Nasal Lavage Fluid
Virus Diseases
Nonparametric Statistics
Viral Load
Respiratory Tract Infections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology

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Nasal quantities of respirator; syncytial virus in hospitalized infants with and without respiratory failure. / Buckingham, S. C.; Devincenzo, John.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 25, No. 2, 1997, p. 376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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