National trends in hospitalization from indwelling urinary catheter complications, 2001-2010

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate national trends in hospitalization from indwelling urinary catheters complications from 2001 to 2010. Materials and methods: The Healthcare Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was analyzed for this study. We examine hospitalization rates, patient demographics, hospital stays, insurance provider, hospital type, geographic location, and septicemia rates of patients hospitalized for indwelling urinary catheter complications from 2001 to 2010. Results: Hospitalization from indwelling urinary catheters almost quadrupled from 11,742 in 2001 to 40,429 in 2010. The increases have been due to patients who are older and predominantly male compared to all hospitalization. The "national bill" increased from $213 million to $1.3 billion (a factor of 6) after adjusting for inflation. Most patients had urinary tract infections, 77 % in 2001 and 87 % in 2010. Septicemia in indwelling urinary catheter hospitalization patients has increased from 21 % in 2001 to 40 % in 2010. In 2010, secondary diseases associated with hospitalization due to indwelling urinary catheters included urinary tract infections (86.5 %), adverse effects of medical care (61.9 %), bacterial infection (48.6 %), and septicemia (40.3 %). Conclusions: Hospitalization due to indwelling urinary catheter complications has almost quadrupled from 11,742 in 2001 to 40,429 in 2010, and the majority of patients had urinary tract infections. Septicemia is of particular concern since rates have almost doubled (from 21 to 40 % over the period) in these patients. The specific medical indication for urinary catheters used postoperatively should be scrutinized, and the duration of placement should be minimized to reduce future complication rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-308
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Urology and Nephrology
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Urinary Catheters
Indwelling Catheters
Hospitalization
Sepsis
Urinary Tract Infections
Geographic Locations
Economic Inflation
Insurance
Bacterial Infections
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Demography
Databases
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology
  • Urology

Cite this

National trends in hospitalization from indwelling urinary catheter complications, 2001-2010. / Colli, Janet; Tojuola, Bayo; Patterson, Anthony; Ledbetter, Christopher; Wake, Robert.

In: International Urology and Nephrology, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 303-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate national trends in hospitalization from indwelling urinary catheters complications from 2001 to 2010. Materials and methods: The Healthcare Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was analyzed for this study. We examine hospitalization rates, patient demographics, hospital stays, insurance provider, hospital type, geographic location, and septicemia rates of patients hospitalized for indwelling urinary catheter complications from 2001 to 2010. Results: Hospitalization from indwelling urinary catheters almost quadrupled from 11,742 in 2001 to 40,429 in 2010. The increases have been due to patients who are older and predominantly male compared to all hospitalization. The {"}national bill{"} increased from $213 million to $1.3 billion (a factor of 6) after adjusting for inflation. Most patients had urinary tract infections, 77 {\%} in 2001 and 87 {\%} in 2010. Septicemia in indwelling urinary catheter hospitalization patients has increased from 21 {\%} in 2001 to 40 {\%} in 2010. In 2010, secondary diseases associated with hospitalization due to indwelling urinary catheters included urinary tract infections (86.5 {\%}), adverse effects of medical care (61.9 {\%}), bacterial infection (48.6 {\%}), and septicemia (40.3 {\%}). Conclusions: Hospitalization due to indwelling urinary catheter complications has almost quadrupled from 11,742 in 2001 to 40,429 in 2010, and the majority of patients had urinary tract infections. Septicemia is of particular concern since rates have almost doubled (from 21 to 40 {\%} over the period) in these patients. The specific medical indication for urinary catheters used postoperatively should be scrutinized, and the duration of placement should be minimized to reduce future complication rates.",
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