Natural infection of infants with respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B: A study of frequency, disease severity, and viral load

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Abstract

Heterogeneity in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease severity likely is due to a combination of host and viral factors. Infection with RSV subgroup A is thought to produce more severe disease than RSV-B. Higher RSV loads correlate with greater disease severity in hospitalized infants. Whether subgroup-specific variations in disease severity result from differences in RSV load has not been studied. A total of 102 RSV-hospitalized infants <2 y of age were studied. Nasal washes were collected in a standardized manner and were cultured in <3 h in parallel with an RSV quantitative standard in a HEp-2 plaque assay. RSV-A (72%) was more frequent than RSV-B. Disease severity risk factors were similar between subgroups. RSV loads were similar between A and B subgroups (4.77 versus 4.68 log PFU/mL). Measures of disease severity were also similar between subgroups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)914-917
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Research
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

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Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Viral Load
Infection
Virus Diseases
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Heterogeneity in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease severity likely is due to a combination of host and viral factors. Infection with RSV subgroup A is thought to produce more severe disease than RSV-B. Higher RSV loads correlate with greater disease severity in hospitalized infants. Whether subgroup-specific variations in disease severity result from differences in RSV load has not been studied. A total of 102 RSV-hospitalized infants <2 y of age were studied. Nasal washes were collected in a standardized manner and were cultured in <3 h in parallel with an RSV quantitative standard in a HEp-2 plaque assay. RSV-A (72{\%}) was more frequent than RSV-B. Disease severity risk factors were similar between subgroups. RSV loads were similar between A and B subgroups (4.77 versus 4.68 log PFU/mL). Measures of disease severity were also similar between subgroups.",
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AU - Devincenzo, John

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