Neonatal Immune Responses during Group B Streptococcal Infections

Kirtikumar Upadhyay, Ajay Talati

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Group B streptococcus (GBS) still remains an important cause of neonatal sepsis in spite of various preventive strategies. The immune response of a neonate varies from an adult human immune system and makes a newborn more vulnerable to illness not typically manifested by adults. Microbial virulence, bacterial load, and immaturity of immune response system may explain the variation in severity of illness in term and preterm neonates. In this review, the mechanisms of GBS invasion and infection in a neonate are described. We also try to identify the host immune response to various bacterial components of GBS and possible future strategies to mitigate this immune response to improve neonatal outcomes after GBS sepsis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-170
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Streptococcal Infections
Streptococcus agalactiae
Newborn Infant
Immune System
Bacterial Load
Virulence
Sepsis
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Neonatal Immune Responses during Group B Streptococcal Infections. / Upadhyay, Kirtikumar; Talati, Ajay.

In: Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 164-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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