Neovasculature in bone marrow stem cell mobilization for treating myocardial infarction

Bin Wang, Yao Sun, Arnold Postlethwaite, Karl Weber, Mohammad F. Kiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stem cell therapy offers a potential venue with which autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSC) have the potential to regenerate functioning myocardial tissue in situ soon after myocardial infarction (MI). When they migrate to sites of MI, they can differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and nerve cells. We have developed a method to substantially increase the small amounts of circulating BMDSC following MI. Rebuilt myocardium must include a vascular network able to nourish it under diverse metabolic demands. We intend to quantify the viability and functionality of the microvasculature 1-4 weeks post MI with or without BMDSC mobilization to assess the ability of this neovasculature to deliver oxygen to the tissue. Fluorescent staining is used to visualize perfused and nonperfused neovasculature, and immunohistochemical staining is used for quantification of tissue hypoxia. Our preliminary results indicate that the decrease in the number of anatomical and perfused vessels after MI, is accompanied by a progressive increase in the distance to the nearest perfused blood vessel and the level of hypoxia in the infarcted tissue. These preclinical studies may aid in design of BMDSC mobilization strategies to treat humans with MI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)748-749
Number of pages2
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
Stem cells
Bone Marrow Cells
Bone
Myocardial Infarction
Tissue
Bone Marrow
Stem Cells
Blood Vessels
Staining and Labeling
Endothelial cells
Blood vessels
Neurons
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Microvessels
Cardiac Myocytes
Myocardium
Endothelial Cells
Oxygen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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abstract = "Stem cell therapy offers a potential venue with which autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSC) have the potential to regenerate functioning myocardial tissue in situ soon after myocardial infarction (MI). When they migrate to sites of MI, they can differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and nerve cells. We have developed a method to substantially increase the small amounts of circulating BMDSC following MI. Rebuilt myocardium must include a vascular network able to nourish it under diverse metabolic demands. We intend to quantify the viability and functionality of the microvasculature 1-4 weeks post MI with or without BMDSC mobilization to assess the ability of this neovasculature to deliver oxygen to the tissue. Fluorescent staining is used to visualize perfused and nonperfused neovasculature, and immunohistochemical staining is used for quantification of tissue hypoxia. Our preliminary results indicate that the decrease in the number of anatomical and perfused vessels after MI, is accompanied by a progressive increase in the distance to the nearest perfused blood vessel and the level of hypoxia in the infarcted tissue. These preclinical studies may aid in design of BMDSC mobilization strategies to treat humans with MI.",
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AB - Stem cell therapy offers a potential venue with which autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSC) have the potential to regenerate functioning myocardial tissue in situ soon after myocardial infarction (MI). When they migrate to sites of MI, they can differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and nerve cells. We have developed a method to substantially increase the small amounts of circulating BMDSC following MI. Rebuilt myocardium must include a vascular network able to nourish it under diverse metabolic demands. We intend to quantify the viability and functionality of the microvasculature 1-4 weeks post MI with or without BMDSC mobilization to assess the ability of this neovasculature to deliver oxygen to the tissue. Fluorescent staining is used to visualize perfused and nonperfused neovasculature, and immunohistochemical staining is used for quantification of tissue hypoxia. Our preliminary results indicate that the decrease in the number of anatomical and perfused vessels after MI, is accompanied by a progressive increase in the distance to the nearest perfused blood vessel and the level of hypoxia in the infarcted tissue. These preclinical studies may aid in design of BMDSC mobilization strategies to treat humans with MI.

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