Neural correlates of olfactory learning

Critical role of centrifugal neuromodulation

Max Fletcher, Wei R. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mammalian olfactory system is well established for its remarkable capability of undergoing experience-dependent plasticity. Although this process involves changes at multiple stages throughout the central olfactory pathway, even the early stages of processing, such as the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, can display a high degree of plasticity. As in other sensory systems, this plasticity can be controlled by centrifugal inputs from brain regions known to be involved in attention and learning processes. Specifically, both the bulb and cortex receive heavy inputs from cholinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic modulatory systems. These neuromodulators are shown to have profound effects on both odor processing and odor memory by acting on both inhibitory local interneurons and output neurons in both regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-570
Number of pages10
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Learning
Olfactory Pathways
Olfactory Bulb
Interneurons
Cholinergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Neurons
Brain
Odorants
Olfactory Cortex
Piriform Cortex

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Neural correlates of olfactory learning : Critical role of centrifugal neuromodulation. / Fletcher, Max; Chen, Wei R.

In: Learning and Memory, Vol. 17, No. 11, 01.11.2010, p. 561-570.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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