Neuroanatomy and physiology of aphasia

Evidence from positron emission tomography

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Positron emission tomography allows for the study of brain physiology and chemistry in humans. Most studies to date have examined cerebral blood flow, oxygen or glucose metabolism. Studies in aphasic patients have focused on glucose metabolism and have demonstrated that the extent of cerebral metabolic changes consistently involves brain regions which are not structurally damaged. These remote metabolic changes follow consistent patterns that are dependent on the location and extent of structural damage. Metabolic changes were variably found in undamaged prefrontal lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus. Variation in clinical aphasic syndromes were found to relate to these metabolic changes, suggesting that some aspects of the clinical features result from differences in prefrontal function rather than directly from structural damage to perisylvian structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-33
Number of pages31
JournalAphasiology
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Fingerprint

Neuroanatomy
Aphasia
speech disorder
physiology
Positron-Emission Tomography
Cerebrovascular Circulation
brain
Brain Chemistry
damages
Glucose
Basal Ganglia
Thalamus
evidence
chemistry
Oxygen
Brain
Physiology
Positron Emission Tomography
Damage
Metabolism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Neuroanatomy and physiology of aphasia : Evidence from positron emission tomography. / Metter, E.

In: Aphasiology, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.01.1987, p. 3-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AB - Positron emission tomography allows for the study of brain physiology and chemistry in humans. Most studies to date have examined cerebral blood flow, oxygen or glucose metabolism. Studies in aphasic patients have focused on glucose metabolism and have demonstrated that the extent of cerebral metabolic changes consistently involves brain regions which are not structurally damaged. These remote metabolic changes follow consistent patterns that are dependent on the location and extent of structural damage. Metabolic changes were variably found in undamaged prefrontal lobe, basal ganglia and thalamus. Variation in clinical aphasic syndromes were found to relate to these metabolic changes, suggesting that some aspects of the clinical features result from differences in prefrontal function rather than directly from structural damage to perisylvian structures.

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