Neurochemical regulation of oxytocin secretion in lactation*

William R. Crowley, William Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

167 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nonapeptide oxytocin (OT) is an excellent example of a messenger molecule with diverse physiological actions as well as modes of delivery to its target cells (1, 2). After release from neurosecretory terminals in the neurohypophysis, OT exerts effects as a hormone carried by the systemic circulation to distant target organs, perhaps the most important of which are the mammary gland and uterus (1). In addition, OT may serve as a hypophyseotropic factor, released from nerve terminals in the median eminence into the pituitary portal vasculature, to affect anterior pituitary secretion (2–7), as a peptidergic neurotransmitter or neuromodulator acting within the central nervous system to influence a variety of neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic functions (2, 8–13), and as a paracrine regulatory peptide in the ovary and testis (14–18). Although its most widely investigated physiological actions across all of these modalities are related to reproduction, including the processes of lactation and maternal care, OT also appears to participate in a variety of physiological responses to physical and metabolic challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-65
Number of pages33
JournalEndocrine Reviews
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Oxytocin
Lactation
Neurotransmitter Agents
Posterior Pituitary Gland
Median Eminence
Human Mammary Glands
Uterus
Reproduction
Testis
Ovary
Central Nervous System
Mothers
Hormones
Peptides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Neurochemical regulation of oxytocin secretion in lactation*. / Crowley, William R.; Armstrong, William.

In: Endocrine Reviews, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 33-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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