Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulation of energy homeostasis is critical to the survival of any species. Therefore, intricate behavioral, metabolic, and neuroendocrine mechanisms have evolved to integrate energy intake and dissipation. A delicate balance between intake and expenditure of energy is required to maintain healthy weight. Perhaps for teleological reasons, the mechanisms that regulate energy homeostasis are biased in favor of net positive energy and are geared toward defense of weight loss rather than prevention of obesity. Hence, spontaneous weight loss in the absence of disease is rare and the experience of progressive weight gain in free-living humans is common.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNutrition and Diabetes
Subtitle of host publicationPathophysiology and Management
PublisherCRC Press
Pages5-25
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781420038798
ISBN (Print)9780849323072
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Appetite Regulation
Energy Intake
Weight Loss
Homeostasis
Rare Diseases
Energy Metabolism
Weight Gain
Obesity
Weights and Measures
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dagogo-Jack, S. (2005). Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake. In Nutrition and Diabetes: Pathophysiology and Management (pp. 5-25). CRC Press.

Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake. / Dagogo-Jack, Samuel.

Nutrition and Diabetes: Pathophysiology and Management. CRC Press, 2005. p. 5-25.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dagogo-Jack, S 2005, Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake. in Nutrition and Diabetes: Pathophysiology and Management. CRC Press, pp. 5-25.
Dagogo-Jack S. Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake. In Nutrition and Diabetes: Pathophysiology and Management. CRC Press. 2005. p. 5-25
Dagogo-Jack, Samuel. / Neuroendocrine regulation of food intake. Nutrition and Diabetes: Pathophysiology and Management. CRC Press, 2005. pp. 5-25
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