Neurologic injuries associated with all-terrain vehicles and recommendations for protective measures for the pediatric population

A. Russell, Frederick Boop, W. B. Cherny, B. L. Ligon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To present data and case studies illustrating the danger, especially in the pediatric population, of all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use, and to provide recommendations for pediatricians on how to educate parents concerning ATVs. Design: Retrospective review of 33 patients with neurologic injuries sustained in ATV accidents presenting to one institution over a 40- month period. Setting: Emergency department and neurosurgery service at Arkansas Children's Hospital and two other hospitals that make up the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Patients: All patients (n = 33) who presented between January 1993 and April 1996 at the emergency departments with neurologic injuries sustained in accidents involving either a three- or four-wheel ATV requiring hospitalization. Interventions: Depending on the nature of the injury, various treatments, as described herein. Main outcome measures: Demographic measures, the mechanisms of injury, the types of injuries; the current data available regarding the number of injuries nationwide; and the precautionary measures parents should be advised to take. Results: Ages ranged from four to 68 years (mean, 18; median, 14), 21 of the patients were <16 years old. The predominant age range was 12 to 15 years; most common mechanisms of injury were being thrown to the ground, striking a tree, and flipping backward. Most injuries were cranial (21) or spinal (11). Nationwide, the proportionate number of injuries are decreasing, but the consequences remain severe. Using a helmet and restricting the use of these vehicles will reduce the number and magnitude of injuries. Conclusions: Although perceived as recreational toys, ATVs can be extremely unsafe, especially for children and adolescents; pediatricians should educate parents and patients on the dangers of riding these vehicles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-35
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Nervous System Trauma
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Parents
Accidents
Hospital Emergency Service
Head Protective Devices
Play and Playthings
Neurosurgery
Hospitalization
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Emergency Medicine

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Neurologic injuries associated with all-terrain vehicles and recommendations for protective measures for the pediatric population. / Russell, A.; Boop, Frederick; Cherny, W. B.; Ligon, B. L.

In: Pediatric Emergency Care, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.1998, p. 31-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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