Neuromagnetic evidence of synchronized spontaneous activity in the brain following repetitive sensory stimulation

Livio Narici, Gian Luca Romani, Carlo Salustri, Vittorio Pizzella, Ivo Modena, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuromagnetic measurements in the visual and somatosensory modalities reveal that, following repetitive stimulation, the brain persists in emitting synchronized after-discharges in the form of oscillations with highly specific spectral composition. In the visual modality, this rhythmic activity is centered at the frequency of the resting alpha rhythm and it is most readily induced by stimulation of the same frequency. This suggests that the phenomenon is due to synchronization of the generators responsible for the natural rhythms by the steady-state stimulation and that these generators behave as resonant oscillators. The phenomenon could then be referred to as Synchronized Spontaneous Activity (SSA). The discovery of this phenomenon has important implications for modelling the dynamics of normal evoked and spontaneous cerebral activity as well as for the understanding of pathological conditions such as photically induced epilepsies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-836
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume32
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Alpha Rhythm
Epilepsy
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Neuromagnetic evidence of synchronized spontaneous activity in the brain following repetitive sensory stimulation. / Narici, Livio; Romani, Gian Luca; Salustri, Carlo; Pizzella, Vittorio; Modena, Ivo; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 32, No. 3-4, 01.01.1987, p. 831-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Narici, Livio ; Romani, Gian Luca ; Salustri, Carlo ; Pizzella, Vittorio ; Modena, Ivo ; Papanicolaou, Andrew. / Neuromagnetic evidence of synchronized spontaneous activity in the brain following repetitive sensory stimulation. In: International Journal of Neuroscience. 1987 ; Vol. 32, No. 3-4. pp. 831-836.
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