Neutralizing salivary pH by mouthwashes after an acidic challenge

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Abstract

AIM: The aim of the present study was to test the neutralizing effect of mouthwashes on salivary pH after an acidic challenge.

METHODS: Twelve participants were recruited for three visits, one morning per week. Resting saliva was collected at baseline and after 2-min swishing with 20 mL orange juice as an acidic challenge. Participants then rinsed their mouth for 30 s with 20 mL water (control), an over-the-counter mouthwash (Listerine), or a two-step mouthwash, randomly assigned for each visit. Saliva was collected immediately, 15, and 45 min after rinsing. The pH values of the collected saliva were measured and analyzed with anova, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test (significance level: 0.05).

RESULTS: Orange juice significantly lowered salivary pH. Immediately after rinsing, Listerine and water brought pH back to baseline values, with the pH significantly higher in the Listerine group. The two-step mouthwash raised pH significantly higher than Listerine and water, and higher than the baseline value. Salivary pH returned to baseline and was not significantly different among groups at 15 and 45 min post-rinsing.

CONCLUSIONS: Mouth rinsing after an acidic challenge increased salivary pH. The tested mouthwashes raised pH higher than water. Mouthwashes with a neutralizing effect can potentially reduce tooth erosion from acid exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of investigative and clinical dentistry
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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Mouthwashes
Saliva
Water
Mouth
Tooth Erosion
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{842e34e3dfd2498e9179a184ce3eb956,
title = "Neutralizing salivary pH by mouthwashes after an acidic challenge",
abstract = "AIM: The aim of the present study was to test the neutralizing effect of mouthwashes on salivary pH after an acidic challenge.METHODS: Twelve participants were recruited for three visits, one morning per week. Resting saliva was collected at baseline and after 2-min swishing with 20 mL orange juice as an acidic challenge. Participants then rinsed their mouth for 30 s with 20 mL water (control), an over-the-counter mouthwash (Listerine), or a two-step mouthwash, randomly assigned for each visit. Saliva was collected immediately, 15, and 45 min after rinsing. The pH values of the collected saliva were measured and analyzed with anova, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test (significance level: 0.05).RESULTS: Orange juice significantly lowered salivary pH. Immediately after rinsing, Listerine and water brought pH back to baseline values, with the pH significantly higher in the Listerine group. The two-step mouthwash raised pH significantly higher than Listerine and water, and higher than the baseline value. Salivary pH returned to baseline and was not significantly different among groups at 15 and 45 min post-rinsing.CONCLUSIONS: Mouth rinsing after an acidic challenge increased salivary pH. The tested mouthwashes raised pH higher than water. Mouthwashes with a neutralizing effect can potentially reduce tooth erosion from acid exposure.",
author = "Mojdeh Dehghan and Daranee Versluis and Emily Kymer-Davis and Stewart, {Colette W.} and Yanhui Zhang and Antheunis Versluis and Franklin Garcia-Godoy",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jicd.12198",
language = "English (US)",
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journal = "Journal of investigative and clinical dentistry",
issn = "2041-1618",
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T1 - Neutralizing salivary pH by mouthwashes after an acidic challenge

AU - Dehghan, Mojdeh

AU - Versluis, Daranee

AU - Kymer-Davis, Emily

AU - Stewart, Colette W.

AU - Zhang, Yanhui

AU - Versluis, Antheunis

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - AIM: The aim of the present study was to test the neutralizing effect of mouthwashes on salivary pH after an acidic challenge.METHODS: Twelve participants were recruited for three visits, one morning per week. Resting saliva was collected at baseline and after 2-min swishing with 20 mL orange juice as an acidic challenge. Participants then rinsed their mouth for 30 s with 20 mL water (control), an over-the-counter mouthwash (Listerine), or a two-step mouthwash, randomly assigned for each visit. Saliva was collected immediately, 15, and 45 min after rinsing. The pH values of the collected saliva were measured and analyzed with anova, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test (significance level: 0.05).RESULTS: Orange juice significantly lowered salivary pH. Immediately after rinsing, Listerine and water brought pH back to baseline values, with the pH significantly higher in the Listerine group. The two-step mouthwash raised pH significantly higher than Listerine and water, and higher than the baseline value. Salivary pH returned to baseline and was not significantly different among groups at 15 and 45 min post-rinsing.CONCLUSIONS: Mouth rinsing after an acidic challenge increased salivary pH. The tested mouthwashes raised pH higher than water. Mouthwashes with a neutralizing effect can potentially reduce tooth erosion from acid exposure.

AB - AIM: The aim of the present study was to test the neutralizing effect of mouthwashes on salivary pH after an acidic challenge.METHODS: Twelve participants were recruited for three visits, one morning per week. Resting saliva was collected at baseline and after 2-min swishing with 20 mL orange juice as an acidic challenge. Participants then rinsed their mouth for 30 s with 20 mL water (control), an over-the-counter mouthwash (Listerine), or a two-step mouthwash, randomly assigned for each visit. Saliva was collected immediately, 15, and 45 min after rinsing. The pH values of the collected saliva were measured and analyzed with anova, followed by Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test (significance level: 0.05).RESULTS: Orange juice significantly lowered salivary pH. Immediately after rinsing, Listerine and water brought pH back to baseline values, with the pH significantly higher in the Listerine group. The two-step mouthwash raised pH significantly higher than Listerine and water, and higher than the baseline value. Salivary pH returned to baseline and was not significantly different among groups at 15 and 45 min post-rinsing.CONCLUSIONS: Mouth rinsing after an acidic challenge increased salivary pH. The tested mouthwashes raised pH higher than water. Mouthwashes with a neutralizing effect can potentially reduce tooth erosion from acid exposure.

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