Neutron tomography of particulate filters

A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research

Todd J. Toops, Hassina Z. Bilheux, Sophie Voisin, Jens Gregor, Lakeisha Walker, Andrea Strzelec, Charles E.A. Finney, Josh A. Pihl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research describes the development and implementation of high-fidelity neutron imaging and the associated analysis of the images. This advanced capability allows the non-destructive, non-invasive imaging of particulate filters (PFs) and how the deposition of particulate and catalytic washcoat occurs within the filter. The majority of the efforts described here were performed at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) CG-1D neutron imaging beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the current spatial resolution is approximately 50 μm. The sample holder is equipped with a high-precision rotation stage that allows 3D imaging (i.e., computed tomography) of the sample when combined with computerized reconstruction tools. What enables the neutron-based image is the ability of some elements to absorb or scatter neutrons where other elements allow the neutron to pass through them with negligible interaction. Of particular interest in this study is the scattering of neutrons by hydrogen-containing molecules, such as hydrocarbons (HCs) and/or water, which are adsorbed to the surface of soot, ash and catalytic washcoat. Even so, the interactions with this adsorbed water/HC is low and computational techniques were required to enhance the contrast, primarily a modified simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). This effort describes the following systems: particulate randomly distributed in a PF, ash deposition in PFs, a catalyzed washcoat layer in a PF, and three particulate loadings in a SiC PF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-588
Number of pages8
JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment
Volume729
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2013

Fingerprint

fluid filters
Industrial research
Tomography
Neutrons
tomography
neutrons
particulates
Imaging techniques
ashes
Ashes
high flux isotope reactors
hydrocarbons
Hydrocarbons
soot
Soot
holders
water
Coal ash
Isotopes
ridges

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Neutron tomography of particulate filters : A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research. / Toops, Todd J.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Voisin, Sophie; Gregor, Jens; Walker, Lakeisha; Strzelec, Andrea; Finney, Charles E.A.; Pihl, Josh A.

In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, Vol. 729, 16.09.2013, p. 581-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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