New and emerging therapeutic options for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Lee Schwartzberg, Hope S. Rugo, Matti S. Aapro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains one of the most challenging adverse events of chemotherapy, and one that has substantial negative effects on patients, clinicians, and the wider health care system. Use of CINV prophylaxis consistent with clinical practice guidelines is essential for attaining optimal CINV control. In recent years, there has been a dramatic improvement in the control of CINV with the introduction of effective antiemetic agents, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT3]) receptor antagonists (ondansetron, granisetron, and palonosetron) and the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists (aprepitant and fosaprepitant). An important benefit of the newer antiemetic agents is their improved ability to control the delayed CINV that can develop in the days after chemotherapy administration. In October 2014, a fixed-dose oral combination containing the novel NK1 receptor antagonist netupitant and palonosetron (NEPA) received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration. The combination of 2 effective antiemetic agents in a single, oral capsule may help simplify CINV management. Ongoing studies are evaluating new CINV approaches (eg, the novel NK1 receptor antagonist rolapitant), as well as the optimal use of existing therapies. Patient education regarding the timing, prevention, and treatment of CINV is another key component of CINV management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical advances in hematology & oncology : H&O
Volume13
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Nausea
Vomiting
Drug Therapy
Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists
Antiemetics
Therapeutics
fosaprepitant
aprepitant
Granisetron
Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Ondansetron
Patient Education
United States Food and Drug Administration
Practice Guidelines
Capsules
Serotonin
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

New and emerging therapeutic options for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. / Schwartzberg, Lee; Rugo, Hope S.; Aapro, Matti S.

In: Clinical advances in hematology & oncology : H&O, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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