New hope for the failing heart

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One sixth of this nation's citizens have disease of the heart and blood vessels; an estimated 3.5 to 4 million Americans have chronic cardiac failure. The individual and collective losses associated with heart failure are enormous. Standard medical therapy with digitalis and diuretics is frequently inadequate to control the morbidity associated with this oftentimes malignant process. More effective medical therapy is therefore needed. The recent development of potent, orally active cardiotonic agents may make this objective a reality. At the present time, the new cardiotonic agents are still in the experimental stages of investigation. Phase II and III clinical trials must be either initiated or completed before the efficacy and safety of these agents will be known. It must be emphasized that objective parameters of ventricular function and the patient's quality of life must be monitored if meaningful verdicts are to be rendered. Information must be gathered that indicates whether prolonged therapy with these agents is detrimental to the myocardium. Despite this caveat, the availability of compounds having potent inotropic properties has generated much anticipation and excitement in clinical cardiology. Our ability to more effectively manage patients with chronic cardiac failure may now be on the horizon. There is, indeed, new hope for the failing heart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-671
Number of pages7
JournalThe American journal of medicine
Volume72
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

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Cardiotonic Agents
Heart Failure
Phase III Clinical Trials
Phase II Clinical Trials
Ventricular Function
Digitalis
Cardiology
Diuretics
Blood Vessels
Heart Diseases
Myocardium
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Morbidity
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

New hope for the failing heart. / Weber, Karl.

In: The American journal of medicine, Vol. 72, No. 4, 01.01.1982, p. 665-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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