New technique for marking the location of mustardé horizontal mattress sutures

Carl B. Pearl, Robert Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protruding ears are the most common congenital deformity in the head and neck area.3 In 1910, Lucket demonstrated that the deformity of protruding ears was chiefly a result of abnormal folding of the antihelix.4 The primary goal in correcting protruding ears is to create an antihelical fold that appears natural and is evenly rounded and devoid of sharp edges. McDowell described the goals in otoplasty for protruding ears as the following: All traces of protrusion in the upper third of the ear must be corrected. From the front view, the helix of both ears should be seen beyond the anithelix. The helix should have a smooth and regular line throughout. The postauricular sulcus should not be markedly decreased or distorted. The ear should not be placed too close to the head (the posterior measurements from the outer edge of the helix to the skin of the mastoid region should be 10 to 12 mm superiorly, 16 to 18 mm in the middle third, and 20 to 22 mm inferiorly). The position of the two ears (i.e., the distancefrom the lateral border to the head) should match fairly closely-to within 3 mm at any given point.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1468-1470
Number of pages3
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume123
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mustard Plant
Sutures
Ear
Head
Mastoid
Neck
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

New technique for marking the location of mustardé horizontal mattress sutures. / Pearl, Carl B.; Wallace, Robert.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 123, No. 5, 01.05.2009, p. 1468-1470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{661ad4c7d76f44249dba2f383631c07d,
title = "New technique for marking the location of mustard{\'e} horizontal mattress sutures",
abstract = "Protruding ears are the most common congenital deformity in the head and neck area.3 In 1910, Lucket demonstrated that the deformity of protruding ears was chiefly a result of abnormal folding of the antihelix.4 The primary goal in correcting protruding ears is to create an antihelical fold that appears natural and is evenly rounded and devoid of sharp edges. McDowell described the goals in otoplasty for protruding ears as the following: All traces of protrusion in the upper third of the ear must be corrected. From the front view, the helix of both ears should be seen beyond the anithelix. The helix should have a smooth and regular line throughout. The postauricular sulcus should not be markedly decreased or distorted. The ear should not be placed too close to the head (the posterior measurements from the outer edge of the helix to the skin of the mastoid region should be 10 to 12 mm superiorly, 16 to 18 mm in the middle third, and 20 to 22 mm inferiorly). The position of the two ears (i.e., the distancefrom the lateral border to the head) should match fairly closely-to within 3 mm at any given point.",
author = "Pearl, {Carl B.} and Robert Wallace",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181a0739e",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "123",
pages = "1468--1470",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - New technique for marking the location of mustardé horizontal mattress sutures

AU - Pearl, Carl B.

AU - Wallace, Robert

PY - 2009/5/1

Y1 - 2009/5/1

N2 - Protruding ears are the most common congenital deformity in the head and neck area.3 In 1910, Lucket demonstrated that the deformity of protruding ears was chiefly a result of abnormal folding of the antihelix.4 The primary goal in correcting protruding ears is to create an antihelical fold that appears natural and is evenly rounded and devoid of sharp edges. McDowell described the goals in otoplasty for protruding ears as the following: All traces of protrusion in the upper third of the ear must be corrected. From the front view, the helix of both ears should be seen beyond the anithelix. The helix should have a smooth and regular line throughout. The postauricular sulcus should not be markedly decreased or distorted. The ear should not be placed too close to the head (the posterior measurements from the outer edge of the helix to the skin of the mastoid region should be 10 to 12 mm superiorly, 16 to 18 mm in the middle third, and 20 to 22 mm inferiorly). The position of the two ears (i.e., the distancefrom the lateral border to the head) should match fairly closely-to within 3 mm at any given point.

AB - Protruding ears are the most common congenital deformity in the head and neck area.3 In 1910, Lucket demonstrated that the deformity of protruding ears was chiefly a result of abnormal folding of the antihelix.4 The primary goal in correcting protruding ears is to create an antihelical fold that appears natural and is evenly rounded and devoid of sharp edges. McDowell described the goals in otoplasty for protruding ears as the following: All traces of protrusion in the upper third of the ear must be corrected. From the front view, the helix of both ears should be seen beyond the anithelix. The helix should have a smooth and regular line throughout. The postauricular sulcus should not be markedly decreased or distorted. The ear should not be placed too close to the head (the posterior measurements from the outer edge of the helix to the skin of the mastoid region should be 10 to 12 mm superiorly, 16 to 18 mm in the middle third, and 20 to 22 mm inferiorly). The position of the two ears (i.e., the distancefrom the lateral border to the head) should match fairly closely-to within 3 mm at any given point.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=66549120073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=66549120073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181a0739e

DO - 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181a0739e

M3 - Article

VL - 123

SP - 1468

EP - 1470

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 5

ER -