Next-Generation Airbags and the Possibility of Negative Outcomes Due to Thoracic Injury

Rami Khouzam, Saleem Al-Mawed, Victor Farah, Adam Mizeracki

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Airbags have been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with motor vehicle accidents when used in conjunction with seat belts. Airbag deployment alone however, has recently been implicated as a cause of significant thoracic injuries to unrestrained drivers. Resulting injuries include major cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. Airbags provide safety to occupants of cars and reduce mortality by 25%-30%. When not used in accordance with international standards, however, they can cause serious injury. We searched online databases from 1970 to January 2013 and included 17 retrospective studies, 12 systematic review articles, 18 case reports, 5 prospective studies, 1 lab study, 3 cohort studies, and 1 meta-analysis. Outcomes included clinical/functional response, left ventricular remodelling, hospitalizations, and mortality. Physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for injury when evaluating drivers who were not wearing seat belts when airbags deployed, regardless of the speed of the collision, because increased risk of thoracic injury with airbags has been described in the literature. Our review indicates that even new technology, specifically the side air bag, has been associated with a risk of thoracic injury. Considering that regulations are a driving force for airbag technology, further research and scrutiny by medical teams is needed to consider the effects of airbag technology advancements on morbidity and mortality rates of car accidents, to help in guiding further improvement, and to help lawmakers in implementing rules that protect the safety of occupants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-404
Number of pages9
JournalCanadian Journal of Cardiology
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Air Bags
Thoracic Injuries
Seat Belts
Mortality
Technology
Accidents
Wounds and Injuries
Morbidity
Safety
Ventricular Remodeling
Motor Vehicles
Meta-Analysis
Biomedical Research
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Prospective Studies
Physicians
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Next-Generation Airbags and the Possibility of Negative Outcomes Due to Thoracic Injury. / Khouzam, Rami; Al-Mawed, Saleem; Farah, Victor; Mizeracki, Adam.

In: Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 396-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Khouzam, Rami ; Al-Mawed, Saleem ; Farah, Victor ; Mizeracki, Adam. / Next-Generation Airbags and the Possibility of Negative Outcomes Due to Thoracic Injury. In: Canadian Journal of Cardiology. 2014 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 396-404.
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