Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus

Ming D. Li, Justin K. Kane, Steven L. Parker, Kathy McAllen, Shannon G. Matta, Burt Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between cigarette smoking and body weight. In rodents, a negative correlation between nicotine and body weight has been reported, but this observation was largely derived from studies where relatively high doses of nicotine (~12 mg/kg/day) were used. In the current study, we showed that a negative relationship also holds for low doses of nicotine that are comparable to that consumed by average human smokers (<6 mg/kg/day). We also demonstrated that 14 days of nicotine administration (4 mg/kg/day) reduced average daily food intake by 19.5% (P<0.01) in the free-feeding nicotine-treated group compared to saline controls. No significant differences in body weight were detected between the nicotine-treated and pair-fed groups. To determine whether the effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight were related to neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioimmunoassay were utilized to measure NPY mRNA and peptide levels in various regions of the hypothalamus. Significantly higher levels of NPY mRNA (ca. 20-50%) and peptide (ca. 24-69%) were only detected in the nicotine-treated groups. In addition, significantly higher NPY contents were also obtained in two hypothalamic areas of pair-fed control animals. In summary, our data suggest that the pharmacological effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight may be mediated by changes in hypothalamic NPY levels, a neuropeptide that is pivotal to the hypothalamic regulation of food intake. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-164
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research
Volume867
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2000

Fingerprint

Neuropeptide Y
Nicotine
Hypothalamus
Body Weight
Eating
Appetite Regulation
Messenger RNA
Peptides
Neuropeptides
Reverse Transcription
Radioimmunoassay
Epidemiologic Studies
Rodentia
Smoking
Pharmacology
Polymerase Chain Reaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Li, M. D., Kane, J. K., Parker, S. L., McAllen, K., Matta, S. G., & Sharp, B. (2000). Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus. Brain Research, 867(1-2), 157-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02283-6

Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus. / Li, Ming D.; Kane, Justin K.; Parker, Steven L.; McAllen, Kathy; Matta, Shannon G.; Sharp, Burt.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 867, No. 1-2, 09.06.2000, p. 157-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, MD, Kane, JK, Parker, SL, McAllen, K, Matta, SG & Sharp, B 2000, 'Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus', Brain Research, vol. 867, no. 1-2, pp. 157-164. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02283-6
Li, Ming D. ; Kane, Justin K. ; Parker, Steven L. ; McAllen, Kathy ; Matta, Shannon G. ; Sharp, Burt. / Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus. In: Brain Research. 2000 ; Vol. 867, No. 1-2. pp. 157-164.
@article{49178f894f834fa49fd2d25a0399bbe2,
title = "Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus",
abstract = "Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between cigarette smoking and body weight. In rodents, a negative correlation between nicotine and body weight has been reported, but this observation was largely derived from studies where relatively high doses of nicotine (~12 mg/kg/day) were used. In the current study, we showed that a negative relationship also holds for low doses of nicotine that are comparable to that consumed by average human smokers (<6 mg/kg/day). We also demonstrated that 14 days of nicotine administration (4 mg/kg/day) reduced average daily food intake by 19.5{\%} (P<0.01) in the free-feeding nicotine-treated group compared to saline controls. No significant differences in body weight were detected between the nicotine-treated and pair-fed groups. To determine whether the effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight were related to neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioimmunoassay were utilized to measure NPY mRNA and peptide levels in various regions of the hypothalamus. Significantly higher levels of NPY mRNA (ca. 20-50{\%}) and peptide (ca. 24-69{\%}) were only detected in the nicotine-treated groups. In addition, significantly higher NPY contents were also obtained in two hypothalamic areas of pair-fed control animals. In summary, our data suggest that the pharmacological effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight may be mediated by changes in hypothalamic NPY levels, a neuropeptide that is pivotal to the hypothalamic regulation of food intake. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.",
author = "Li, {Ming D.} and Kane, {Justin K.} and Parker, {Steven L.} and Kathy McAllen and Matta, {Shannon G.} and Burt Sharp",
year = "2000",
month = "6",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02283-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "867",
pages = "157--164",
journal = "Brain Research",
issn = "0006-8993",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nicotine administration enhances NPY expression in the rat hypothalamus

AU - Li, Ming D.

AU - Kane, Justin K.

AU - Parker, Steven L.

AU - McAllen, Kathy

AU - Matta, Shannon G.

AU - Sharp, Burt

PY - 2000/6/9

Y1 - 2000/6/9

N2 - Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between cigarette smoking and body weight. In rodents, a negative correlation between nicotine and body weight has been reported, but this observation was largely derived from studies where relatively high doses of nicotine (~12 mg/kg/day) were used. In the current study, we showed that a negative relationship also holds for low doses of nicotine that are comparable to that consumed by average human smokers (<6 mg/kg/day). We also demonstrated that 14 days of nicotine administration (4 mg/kg/day) reduced average daily food intake by 19.5% (P<0.01) in the free-feeding nicotine-treated group compared to saline controls. No significant differences in body weight were detected between the nicotine-treated and pair-fed groups. To determine whether the effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight were related to neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioimmunoassay were utilized to measure NPY mRNA and peptide levels in various regions of the hypothalamus. Significantly higher levels of NPY mRNA (ca. 20-50%) and peptide (ca. 24-69%) were only detected in the nicotine-treated groups. In addition, significantly higher NPY contents were also obtained in two hypothalamic areas of pair-fed control animals. In summary, our data suggest that the pharmacological effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight may be mediated by changes in hypothalamic NPY levels, a neuropeptide that is pivotal to the hypothalamic regulation of food intake. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

AB - Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between cigarette smoking and body weight. In rodents, a negative correlation between nicotine and body weight has been reported, but this observation was largely derived from studies where relatively high doses of nicotine (~12 mg/kg/day) were used. In the current study, we showed that a negative relationship also holds for low doses of nicotine that are comparable to that consumed by average human smokers (<6 mg/kg/day). We also demonstrated that 14 days of nicotine administration (4 mg/kg/day) reduced average daily food intake by 19.5% (P<0.01) in the free-feeding nicotine-treated group compared to saline controls. No significant differences in body weight were detected between the nicotine-treated and pair-fed groups. To determine whether the effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight were related to neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioimmunoassay were utilized to measure NPY mRNA and peptide levels in various regions of the hypothalamus. Significantly higher levels of NPY mRNA (ca. 20-50%) and peptide (ca. 24-69%) were only detected in the nicotine-treated groups. In addition, significantly higher NPY contents were also obtained in two hypothalamic areas of pair-fed control animals. In summary, our data suggest that the pharmacological effects of nicotine on food intake and body weight may be mediated by changes in hypothalamic NPY levels, a neuropeptide that is pivotal to the hypothalamic regulation of food intake. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034625462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034625462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02283-6

DO - 10.1016/S0006-8993(00)02283-6

M3 - Article

VL - 867

SP - 157

EP - 164

JO - Brain Research

JF - Brain Research

SN - 0006-8993

IS - 1-2

ER -