Non-Orthodontic, Non-Restorative Closure of Acquired Diastemata

Rania Livada, Jacob Shiloah, Timothy Hottel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM: To illustrate the reversibility of "pathologic tooth migration" in several patients that were managed by periodontal therapy alone, along with a review of the relevant literature.

BACKGROUND: Pathologic tooth migration (PTM) is a common phenomenon among patients seeking dental care. Different etiologic factors have been implicated in PTM: loss of periodontal support, occlusal interferences, posterior bite collapse, and various oral habits such as: lip biting, tongue thrusting, and playing wind instruments. Identification of all the causative factors involved in PTM is crucial for a successful treatment outcome. Managing severe cases of acquired diastemata may necessitate a complex and a sequential intervention involving periodontic, orthodontic and prosthodontic measures. However, "spontaneous regression" of teeth to their original position may occur in certain cases after elimination of the offending factors.

CONCLUSION: "Spontaneous" closure of acquired diastemata could occur following surgical and/or non-surgical periodontal therapy or removal of occlusal interferences. Correction of pathologically migrated teeth without orthodontic or restorative treatment is feasible, but unpredictable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of the Tennessee Dental Association
Volume95
Issue number2
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Tooth Migration
Diastema
Orthodontics
Tooth
Periodontics
Tooth Loss
Prosthodontics
Dental Care
Bites and Stings
Lip
Tongue
Habits
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Non-Orthodontic, Non-Restorative Closure of Acquired Diastemata. / Livada, Rania; Shiloah, Jacob; Hottel, Timothy.

In: The Journal of the Tennessee Dental Association, Vol. 95, No. 2, 01.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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