Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies

The childhood cancer survivor study

Cheryl L. Cox, Vikki G. Nolan, Wendy Leisenring, Yutaka Yasui, Susan W. Ogg, Ann C. Mertens, Joseph P. Neglia, Kirsten K. Ness, Gregory Armstrong, Les L. Robison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We sought to identify factors, other than cancer-related treatment and presence/severity of chronic health conditions, which may be associated with late mortality risk among adult survivors of pediatric malignancies. Methods: Using the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort and a case-control design, 445 participants who died from causes other than cancer recurrence/progression or non-health-related events were compared with 7,162 surviving participants matched for primary diagnosis, age at baseline questionnaire, time from diagnosis to baseline questionnaire, and time at-risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall/cause-specific mortality. Independent measures included number/severity of chronic conditions, medical care, health-related behaviors, and health perceptions/concerns. Results: Adjusting for education, income, chemotherapy/radiation exposures, and number/severity of chronic health conditions, an increased risk for all-cause mortality was associated with exercising fewer than 3 days/week (OR = 1.72, CI 1.27-2.34), being underweight (OR = 2.58, CI 1.55-4.28), increased medical care utilization (P < 0.001), and self-reported fair to poor health (P < 0.001). Physical activity was associated with a higher risk of death among males (OR = 3.26, CI 1.90-5.61) reporting no exercise compared to those who exercised ≥3 times per week. Ever consuming alcohol was associated with a reduced risk of all-cause (OR = 0.61, CI 0.41-0.89) and other nonexternal causes of death (OR = 0.40, CI 0.20-0.79). Concerns/worries about future health (OR = 1.54, CI 1.10-2.71) were associated with increased all-cause mortality. Conclusions: Factors independent of cancer treatment and chronic health conditions modify the risk of death among adult survivors of pediatric cancer. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Continued cohort observation may inform interventions to reduce mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-471
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Survivors
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Pediatrics
Mortality
Health
Neoplasms
Exercise
Second Primary Neoplasms
Thinness
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Alcohols
Observation
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Recurrence
Drug Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Cox, C. L., Nolan, V. G., Leisenring, W., Yasui, Y., Ogg, S. W., Mertens, A. C., ... Robison, L. L. (2014). Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies: The childhood cancer survivor study. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 8(3), 460-471. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-014-0353-7

Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies : The childhood cancer survivor study. / Cox, Cheryl L.; Nolan, Vikki G.; Leisenring, Wendy; Yasui, Yutaka; Ogg, Susan W.; Mertens, Ann C.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Armstrong, Gregory; Robison, Les L.

In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 460-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, CL, Nolan, VG, Leisenring, W, Yasui, Y, Ogg, SW, Mertens, AC, Neglia, JP, Ness, KK, Armstrong, G & Robison, LL 2014, 'Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies: The childhood cancer survivor study', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 460-471. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-014-0353-7
Cox, Cheryl L. ; Nolan, Vikki G. ; Leisenring, Wendy ; Yasui, Yutaka ; Ogg, Susan W. ; Mertens, Ann C. ; Neglia, Joseph P. ; Ness, Kirsten K. ; Armstrong, Gregory ; Robison, Les L. / Noncancer-related mortality risks in adult survivors of pediatric malignancies : The childhood cancer survivor study. In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 460-471.
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AU - Cox, Cheryl L.

AU - Nolan, Vikki G.

AU - Leisenring, Wendy

AU - Yasui, Yutaka

AU - Ogg, Susan W.

AU - Mertens, Ann C.

AU - Neglia, Joseph P.

AU - Ness, Kirsten K.

AU - Armstrong, Gregory

AU - Robison, Les L.

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