Noniatrogenic esophageal trauma

Darryl S. Weiman, William A. Walker, Kathleen M. Brosnan, James W. Pate, Timothy Fabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few guidelines are available with which to facilitate treatment in patients with noniatrogenic injuries of the esophagus. Early diagnosis and proper management are essential if a good outcome is to be expected. In an effort to define better the treatment of patients with penetrating and blunt injuries of the esophagus, we report our recent 5-year experience at an urban trauma center. From July 1988 to June 1993, nineteen patients with esophageal perforations from penetrating (18) and blunt (1) trauma were identified by our trauma registry. There was no mortality in this group of patients and morbidity was mostly due to associated injuries. Eleven cervical esophageal injuries were repaired. One cervical injury was treated by stopping oral intake and giving intravenous antibiotics. The neck was not drained in 10 of the surgical cases. In 1 patient a tracheoesophageal fistula developed, which later was repaired with a pectoralis muscle flap. Seven perforations were identified in the thoracic (2) and abdominal (5) portions of the esophagus. All were due to gunshot wounds. In 4 cases, a fundal wrap was used to reinforce the repairs. Postoperative contrast studies confirmed that all repairs were intact. We conclude that penetrating and blunt tears of the esophagus can be repaired safely with minimal mortality. Morbidity is usually from associated injuries such as to the spinal cord and trachea. When identified early, cervical esophageal injuries do not need to be drained routinely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-850
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume59
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
Esophagus
Pectoralis Muscles
Esophageal Perforation
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Morbidity
Gunshot Wounds
Nonpenetrating Wounds
Mortality
Trauma Centers
Trachea
Tears
Registries
Early Diagnosis
Spinal Cord
Neck
Thorax
Guidelines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Weiman, D. S., Walker, W. A., Brosnan, K. M., Pate, J. W., & Fabian, T. (1995). Noniatrogenic esophageal trauma. Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 59(4), 845-850. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-4975(95)00008-9

Noniatrogenic esophageal trauma. / Weiman, Darryl S.; Walker, William A.; Brosnan, Kathleen M.; Pate, James W.; Fabian, Timothy.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 59, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 845-850.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiman, DS, Walker, WA, Brosnan, KM, Pate, JW & Fabian, T 1995, 'Noniatrogenic esophageal trauma', Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 845-850. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-4975(95)00008-9
Weiman DS, Walker WA, Brosnan KM, Pate JW, Fabian T. Noniatrogenic esophageal trauma. Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1995 Jan 1;59(4):845-850. https://doi.org/10.1016/0003-4975(95)00008-9
Weiman, Darryl S. ; Walker, William A. ; Brosnan, Kathleen M. ; Pate, James W. ; Fabian, Timothy. / Noniatrogenic esophageal trauma. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 59, No. 4. pp. 845-850.
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