Noninvasive evaluation of vasculogenic impotence

J. D. Edmondson, Paul Hatcher, R. S. McGrath, Michael Freeman, Scott Stevens, Mitchell Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

From December 1991 to December 1992, 32 patients presented to the vascular laboratory for evaluation of erectile dysfunction. Of the 32 men examined, 66% (21) were smokers, 28% (9) had hypertension, and 21% (7) had diabetes. Age ranged from 16 to 64 years with a mean age of 47 years. Evaluation consisted of ankle/arm indices, penile/brachial index, color duplex imaging with peak systolic, end-diastolic, and transverse measurements of the penile arteries. Each patient received intracavernosal papaverine, regitine, and prostaglandin E1. Twenty minutes afterward the duplex examination was repeated. A peak systolic velocity of less than 25 cm/sec and less than 60% increase in diameter of the penile arteries was considered arterial insufficiency, an end-diastolic velocity of greater than 5 cm/sec predicted venous leak. Preinjection peak systolic velocities were 6.1-23.2 cm/sec, end- diastolic velocities from 0.0 to 1.1 cm/sec, and vessel diameter of 1.4-2.8 mm in the normal (n = 13) group 1. Peak systolic velocities of 1.9-24.0 cm/sec, end-diastolic velocities of 0.0-3.4 cm/sec, and vessel diameter of 1.3-3.0 mm in the abnormal (n = 19) group 2. Postinjection peak systolic velocities were 25.4-44.8 cm/sec, end-diastolic velocities 0.0-3.4 cm/sec, and vessel diameter of 2.8-4.2 mm in group 1. Peak systolic velocities of 7.6-62.3 cm/sec, end-diastolic velocities of 0.0-9.1 cm/sec, and vessel diameter of 2.0-4.0 mm in group 2. In group 1, three of four were successfully treated medically, seven others were treated with intermittent injections, and two elected no treatment. In group 2, three had successful dorsal vein ligation, four had prosthetic devices, three had successful medical treatment, four were successfully treated with intermittent injections, and the other six elected no treatment. We feel that noninvasive penile examination aids in the successful determination of therapy for vasculogenic impotency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-127
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Vascular Technology
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Vasculogenic Impotence
Arm
Arteries
Papaverine
Injections
Alprostadil
Phentolamine
Erectile Dysfunction
Therapeutics
Ankle
Ligation
Blood Vessels
Veins
Color
Hypertension
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Noninvasive evaluation of vasculogenic impotence. / Edmondson, J. D.; Hatcher, Paul; McGrath, R. S.; Freeman, Michael; Stevens, Scott; Goldman, Mitchell.

In: Journal of Vascular Technology, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.1994, p. 125-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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