Nonneoplastic enlargement of the pituitary gland in children: A review

Kristian Aquilina, Frederick Boop

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary neoplasms of the pituitary gland are uncommon in children. Physiological enlargement of the gland, however, is universal and can sometimes be confused with a tumor. Due to widespread availability of MR imaging, the number of children referred to pediatric neurosurgeons with an enlarged pituitary associated with nonspecific symptoms, most commonly headache, is increasing. In this review, the authors illustrate two common causes of pituitary enlargement in children, namely physiological hypertrophy of puberty, more commonly seen in females, and secondary hyperplasia caused by hypothyroidism. The importance of early and accurate diagnosis, without recourse to extensive endocrine investigations or inappropriate surgery, is underscored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)510-515
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pituitary Gland
Puberty
Hypothyroidism
Hypertrophy
Hyperplasia
Headache
Early Diagnosis
Neoplasms
Pediatrics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Nonneoplastic enlargement of the pituitary gland in children : A review. / Aquilina, Kristian; Boop, Frederick.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Vol. 7, No. 5, 01.05.2011, p. 510-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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