Nosocomial fever of unknown origin

Igor Z. Abolnik, Joseph S. Fahhoum, Kerry Cleveland, Murray A. Abramson, G. Ralph Corey, Michael Gelfand, Daniel J. Sexton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study described the demographics, etiology, and prognosis of nosocomial fever of unknown origin (FUO) using a retrospective study design. The study sites included a university-controlled, tertiary referral teaching hospital, a university-associated Veterans Administration Hospital, and a large tertiary referral private hospital. The subjects included 141 patients with nosocomial FUO, which was defined as (1) fever ≥38.3°C on three or more occasions in a hospitalized patient receiving short-term care; (2) infection not present or incubating on admission; and (3) uncertain diagnosis after 3 days despite appropriate investigation, including at least a 2-day incubation of microbiologic cultures. The average age of the study subjects was 57.1 ± 17.9 years; men represented 63.8%, and 65.8% had undergone surgery within 30 days before the infectious diseases (ID) consultation. Average fever duration was 15.7 ± 14.1 days. The main causes of nosocomial FUO were infection (34.8%) and drug fever (17.0%). Undiagnosed cases constituted 22.7% of the patients studied. At last follow-up, 83% of the patients were alive, 8.5% were dead due to other causes, and 8.5% were dead presumably due to nosocomial FUO. Nosocomial FUO is a prevalent medical problem and a relatively frequent cause of ID consultation. A timely diagnosis of the cause of nosocomial FUO can potentially save lives and shorten hospitalization time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-398
Number of pages3
JournalInfectious Diseases in Clinical Practice
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999

Fingerprint

Fever of Unknown Origin
Fever
Tertiary Care Centers
Communicable Diseases
Referral and Consultation
Veterans Hospitals
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Private Hospitals
Infection
Teaching Hospitals
Hospitalization
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Abolnik, I. Z., Fahhoum, J. S., Cleveland, K., Abramson, M. A., Corey, G. R., Gelfand, M., & Sexton, D. J. (1999). Nosocomial fever of unknown origin. Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice, 8(8), 396-398. https://doi.org/10.1097/00019048-199911000-00010

Nosocomial fever of unknown origin. / Abolnik, Igor Z.; Fahhoum, Joseph S.; Cleveland, Kerry; Abramson, Murray A.; Corey, G. Ralph; Gelfand, Michael; Sexton, Daniel J.

In: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice, Vol. 8, No. 8, 01.11.1999, p. 396-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abolnik, IZ, Fahhoum, JS, Cleveland, K, Abramson, MA, Corey, GR, Gelfand, M & Sexton, DJ 1999, 'Nosocomial fever of unknown origin', Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 396-398. https://doi.org/10.1097/00019048-199911000-00010
Abolnik, Igor Z. ; Fahhoum, Joseph S. ; Cleveland, Kerry ; Abramson, Murray A. ; Corey, G. Ralph ; Gelfand, Michael ; Sexton, Daniel J. / Nosocomial fever of unknown origin. In: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice. 1999 ; Vol. 8, No. 8. pp. 396-398.
@article{41e2611322f84d0eb8310d8f9645444f,
title = "Nosocomial fever of unknown origin",
abstract = "This study described the demographics, etiology, and prognosis of nosocomial fever of unknown origin (FUO) using a retrospective study design. The study sites included a university-controlled, tertiary referral teaching hospital, a university-associated Veterans Administration Hospital, and a large tertiary referral private hospital. The subjects included 141 patients with nosocomial FUO, which was defined as (1) fever ≥38.3°C on three or more occasions in a hospitalized patient receiving short-term care; (2) infection not present or incubating on admission; and (3) uncertain diagnosis after 3 days despite appropriate investigation, including at least a 2-day incubation of microbiologic cultures. The average age of the study subjects was 57.1 ± 17.9 years; men represented 63.8{\%}, and 65.8{\%} had undergone surgery within 30 days before the infectious diseases (ID) consultation. Average fever duration was 15.7 ± 14.1 days. The main causes of nosocomial FUO were infection (34.8{\%}) and drug fever (17.0{\%}). Undiagnosed cases constituted 22.7{\%} of the patients studied. At last follow-up, 83{\%} of the patients were alive, 8.5{\%} were dead due to other causes, and 8.5{\%} were dead presumably due to nosocomial FUO. Nosocomial FUO is a prevalent medical problem and a relatively frequent cause of ID consultation. A timely diagnosis of the cause of nosocomial FUO can potentially save lives and shorten hospitalization time.",
author = "Abolnik, {Igor Z.} and Fahhoum, {Joseph S.} and Kerry Cleveland and Abramson, {Murray A.} and Corey, {G. Ralph} and Michael Gelfand and Sexton, {Daniel J.}",
year = "1999",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00019048-199911000-00010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "396--398",
journal = "Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice",
issn = "1056-9103",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nosocomial fever of unknown origin

AU - Abolnik, Igor Z.

AU - Fahhoum, Joseph S.

AU - Cleveland, Kerry

AU - Abramson, Murray A.

AU - Corey, G. Ralph

AU - Gelfand, Michael

AU - Sexton, Daniel J.

PY - 1999/11/1

Y1 - 1999/11/1

N2 - This study described the demographics, etiology, and prognosis of nosocomial fever of unknown origin (FUO) using a retrospective study design. The study sites included a university-controlled, tertiary referral teaching hospital, a university-associated Veterans Administration Hospital, and a large tertiary referral private hospital. The subjects included 141 patients with nosocomial FUO, which was defined as (1) fever ≥38.3°C on three or more occasions in a hospitalized patient receiving short-term care; (2) infection not present or incubating on admission; and (3) uncertain diagnosis after 3 days despite appropriate investigation, including at least a 2-day incubation of microbiologic cultures. The average age of the study subjects was 57.1 ± 17.9 years; men represented 63.8%, and 65.8% had undergone surgery within 30 days before the infectious diseases (ID) consultation. Average fever duration was 15.7 ± 14.1 days. The main causes of nosocomial FUO were infection (34.8%) and drug fever (17.0%). Undiagnosed cases constituted 22.7% of the patients studied. At last follow-up, 83% of the patients were alive, 8.5% were dead due to other causes, and 8.5% were dead presumably due to nosocomial FUO. Nosocomial FUO is a prevalent medical problem and a relatively frequent cause of ID consultation. A timely diagnosis of the cause of nosocomial FUO can potentially save lives and shorten hospitalization time.

AB - This study described the demographics, etiology, and prognosis of nosocomial fever of unknown origin (FUO) using a retrospective study design. The study sites included a university-controlled, tertiary referral teaching hospital, a university-associated Veterans Administration Hospital, and a large tertiary referral private hospital. The subjects included 141 patients with nosocomial FUO, which was defined as (1) fever ≥38.3°C on three or more occasions in a hospitalized patient receiving short-term care; (2) infection not present or incubating on admission; and (3) uncertain diagnosis after 3 days despite appropriate investigation, including at least a 2-day incubation of microbiologic cultures. The average age of the study subjects was 57.1 ± 17.9 years; men represented 63.8%, and 65.8% had undergone surgery within 30 days before the infectious diseases (ID) consultation. Average fever duration was 15.7 ± 14.1 days. The main causes of nosocomial FUO were infection (34.8%) and drug fever (17.0%). Undiagnosed cases constituted 22.7% of the patients studied. At last follow-up, 83% of the patients were alive, 8.5% were dead due to other causes, and 8.5% were dead presumably due to nosocomial FUO. Nosocomial FUO is a prevalent medical problem and a relatively frequent cause of ID consultation. A timely diagnosis of the cause of nosocomial FUO can potentially save lives and shorten hospitalization time.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032733860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032733860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00019048-199911000-00010

DO - 10.1097/00019048-199911000-00010

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 396

EP - 398

JO - Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice

JF - Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice

SN - 1056-9103

IS - 8

ER -