Number, origins, and chemical types of rat pallidostriatal projection neurons

Hitoshi Kita, Takako Kita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dorsal globus pallidus (GP) receives major inputs from the dorsal neostriatum (Str), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the dorsal thalamus. The GP projects to multiple basal ganglia nuclei. One of the GP projection sites is the Str. The pallidostriatal projection has been considered minor. However, several recent studies have suggested that this projection is heavier than previously thought and that it might play a significant role in controlling the activity of the Str. To reveal more details of this projection, we examined the number of GP neurons that participated in the projection, their origins in the GP and their immunoreactivity for the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), by using a combination of Fluoro-Gold (FG) retrograde labeling and immunohistochemical methods. Immunostaining for the calcium binding protein calbindin-28K (CaBP) was used to identify the CaBP-poor sensorimotor and CaBP-rich associative Str regions and the corresponding CaBP-poor middle, CaBP-rich border, and the caudomedial GP regions. The CaBP-poor dorsolateral Str region occupies a small portion of the Str, whereas the CaBP-poor middle GP region occupies a large portion of the GP. The immunostaining for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) was used to visualize neurons that were immunonegative for FG or PV. Cell counts revealed that the middle GP region contained a higher density of neurons and also a higher percentage of PV-positive neurons than the border and caudomedial regions of the GP. These observations suggested that the GP is involved more in sensorimotor function than associative function. Approximately 40% of neurons in the CaBP-poor middle GP region project to the CaBP-poor part of the dorsolateral Str. Approximately 30% of the neurons in both the CaBP-rich border and the caudomedial GP regions project to the CaBP-rich Str region. More than 40% of the pallidostriatal neurons in CaBP-poor middle GP region are PV-positive, whereas most of those in CaBP-rich GP regions are PV-negative. It was estimated from the cell count data that most of the PV-negative neurons in all three regions of the GP project to the Str. The results indicate that the sensorimotor and associative territories of the Str have reciprocal projections between corresponding territories of the GP. The involvement of a large number of GP neurons suggested that the pallidostriatal projection should be taken into account in the analysis of functional roles of the basal ganglia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-448
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume437
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2001

Fingerprint

Globus Pallidus
Calbindins
Calcium-Binding Proteins
Neurons
Parvalbumins
Basal Ganglia
Cell Count
Neostriatum
Subthalamic Nucleus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Number, origins, and chemical types of rat pallidostriatal projection neurons. / Kita, Hitoshi; Kita, Takako.

In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 437, No. 4, 03.09.2001, p. 438-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a38d3a28c8ab4faf98bf0170e4acaace,
title = "Number, origins, and chemical types of rat pallidostriatal projection neurons",
abstract = "The dorsal globus pallidus (GP) receives major inputs from the dorsal neostriatum (Str), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the dorsal thalamus. The GP projects to multiple basal ganglia nuclei. One of the GP projection sites is the Str. The pallidostriatal projection has been considered minor. However, several recent studies have suggested that this projection is heavier than previously thought and that it might play a significant role in controlling the activity of the Str. To reveal more details of this projection, we examined the number of GP neurons that participated in the projection, their origins in the GP and their immunoreactivity for the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), by using a combination of Fluoro-Gold (FG) retrograde labeling and immunohistochemical methods. Immunostaining for the calcium binding protein calbindin-28K (CaBP) was used to identify the CaBP-poor sensorimotor and CaBP-rich associative Str regions and the corresponding CaBP-poor middle, CaBP-rich border, and the caudomedial GP regions. The CaBP-poor dorsolateral Str region occupies a small portion of the Str, whereas the CaBP-poor middle GP region occupies a large portion of the GP. The immunostaining for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) was used to visualize neurons that were immunonegative for FG or PV. Cell counts revealed that the middle GP region contained a higher density of neurons and also a higher percentage of PV-positive neurons than the border and caudomedial regions of the GP. These observations suggested that the GP is involved more in sensorimotor function than associative function. Approximately 40{\%} of neurons in the CaBP-poor middle GP region project to the CaBP-poor part of the dorsolateral Str. Approximately 30{\%} of the neurons in both the CaBP-rich border and the caudomedial GP regions project to the CaBP-rich Str region. More than 40{\%} of the pallidostriatal neurons in CaBP-poor middle GP region are PV-positive, whereas most of those in CaBP-rich GP regions are PV-negative. It was estimated from the cell count data that most of the PV-negative neurons in all three regions of the GP project to the Str. The results indicate that the sensorimotor and associative territories of the Str have reciprocal projections between corresponding territories of the GP. The involvement of a large number of GP neurons suggested that the pallidostriatal projection should be taken into account in the analysis of functional roles of the basal ganglia.",
author = "Hitoshi Kita and Takako Kita",
year = "2001",
month = "9",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1002/cne.1294",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "437",
pages = "438--448",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Neurology",
issn = "0021-9967",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Number, origins, and chemical types of rat pallidostriatal projection neurons

AU - Kita, Hitoshi

AU - Kita, Takako

PY - 2001/9/3

Y1 - 2001/9/3

N2 - The dorsal globus pallidus (GP) receives major inputs from the dorsal neostriatum (Str), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the dorsal thalamus. The GP projects to multiple basal ganglia nuclei. One of the GP projection sites is the Str. The pallidostriatal projection has been considered minor. However, several recent studies have suggested that this projection is heavier than previously thought and that it might play a significant role in controlling the activity of the Str. To reveal more details of this projection, we examined the number of GP neurons that participated in the projection, their origins in the GP and their immunoreactivity for the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), by using a combination of Fluoro-Gold (FG) retrograde labeling and immunohistochemical methods. Immunostaining for the calcium binding protein calbindin-28K (CaBP) was used to identify the CaBP-poor sensorimotor and CaBP-rich associative Str regions and the corresponding CaBP-poor middle, CaBP-rich border, and the caudomedial GP regions. The CaBP-poor dorsolateral Str region occupies a small portion of the Str, whereas the CaBP-poor middle GP region occupies a large portion of the GP. The immunostaining for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) was used to visualize neurons that were immunonegative for FG or PV. Cell counts revealed that the middle GP region contained a higher density of neurons and also a higher percentage of PV-positive neurons than the border and caudomedial regions of the GP. These observations suggested that the GP is involved more in sensorimotor function than associative function. Approximately 40% of neurons in the CaBP-poor middle GP region project to the CaBP-poor part of the dorsolateral Str. Approximately 30% of the neurons in both the CaBP-rich border and the caudomedial GP regions project to the CaBP-rich Str region. More than 40% of the pallidostriatal neurons in CaBP-poor middle GP region are PV-positive, whereas most of those in CaBP-rich GP regions are PV-negative. It was estimated from the cell count data that most of the PV-negative neurons in all three regions of the GP project to the Str. The results indicate that the sensorimotor and associative territories of the Str have reciprocal projections between corresponding territories of the GP. The involvement of a large number of GP neurons suggested that the pallidostriatal projection should be taken into account in the analysis of functional roles of the basal ganglia.

AB - The dorsal globus pallidus (GP) receives major inputs from the dorsal neostriatum (Str), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the dorsal thalamus. The GP projects to multiple basal ganglia nuclei. One of the GP projection sites is the Str. The pallidostriatal projection has been considered minor. However, several recent studies have suggested that this projection is heavier than previously thought and that it might play a significant role in controlling the activity of the Str. To reveal more details of this projection, we examined the number of GP neurons that participated in the projection, their origins in the GP and their immunoreactivity for the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), by using a combination of Fluoro-Gold (FG) retrograde labeling and immunohistochemical methods. Immunostaining for the calcium binding protein calbindin-28K (CaBP) was used to identify the CaBP-poor sensorimotor and CaBP-rich associative Str regions and the corresponding CaBP-poor middle, CaBP-rich border, and the caudomedial GP regions. The CaBP-poor dorsolateral Str region occupies a small portion of the Str, whereas the CaBP-poor middle GP region occupies a large portion of the GP. The immunostaining for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) was used to visualize neurons that were immunonegative for FG or PV. Cell counts revealed that the middle GP region contained a higher density of neurons and also a higher percentage of PV-positive neurons than the border and caudomedial regions of the GP. These observations suggested that the GP is involved more in sensorimotor function than associative function. Approximately 40% of neurons in the CaBP-poor middle GP region project to the CaBP-poor part of the dorsolateral Str. Approximately 30% of the neurons in both the CaBP-rich border and the caudomedial GP regions project to the CaBP-rich Str region. More than 40% of the pallidostriatal neurons in CaBP-poor middle GP region are PV-positive, whereas most of those in CaBP-rich GP regions are PV-negative. It was estimated from the cell count data that most of the PV-negative neurons in all three regions of the GP project to the Str. The results indicate that the sensorimotor and associative territories of the Str have reciprocal projections between corresponding territories of the GP. The involvement of a large number of GP neurons suggested that the pallidostriatal projection should be taken into account in the analysis of functional roles of the basal ganglia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035801965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035801965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cne.1294

DO - 10.1002/cne.1294

M3 - Article

C2 - 11503145

AN - SCOPUS:0035801965

VL - 437

SP - 438

EP - 448

JO - Journal of Comparative Neurology

JF - Journal of Comparative Neurology

SN - 0021-9967

IS - 4

ER -