Nutritional support of critically ill neurosurgical patients

Roland Dickerson, Peter Faber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Survivors of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) are potentially left with substantial cognitive and/or physical impairment. Early and adequate nutritional therapy is challenging in these patients, but if achieved, can also potentially improve clinical outcomes, particularly for the patient with TBI. Patients suffering from severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale <8) are among the most hyper-metabolic and hyper-catabolic of all critically ill patients, second only to those with substantial thermal injury. Since the rate of protein catabolism during the acute phase post-injury can exceed three to four times the rate of body protein loss compared to simple starvation in unstressed individuals, marked protein depletion can occur rapidly. A Cochrane analysis of nutritional support in TBI patients has concluded that early nutrition therapy reduces infection rates and may improve survival for patients. Most clinicians therefore view early and adequate nutrition therapy as essential for achievement of a positive clinical outcome. Early nutrition therapy may be defined as initiation of therapy within 24 to 72 hours of injury. However, most of the studies examining early versus delayed nutrition therapy used the definition of early nutrition therapy as within 48 hours of injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNutrition in Critical Care
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages117-134
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781139342452
ISBN (Print)9781107669017
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Nutritional Support
Nutrition Therapy
Critical Illness
Secondary Prevention
Wounds and Injuries
Glasgow Coma Scale
Proteins
Starvation
Spinal Cord Injuries
Survivors
Hot Temperature
Survival
Traumatic Brain Injury
Therapeutics
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dickerson, R., & Faber, P. (2014). Nutritional support of critically ill neurosurgical patients. In Nutrition in Critical Care (pp. 117-134). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139342452.013

Nutritional support of critically ill neurosurgical patients. / Dickerson, Roland; Faber, Peter.

Nutrition in Critical Care. Cambridge University Press, 2014. p. 117-134.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dickerson, R & Faber, P 2014, Nutritional support of critically ill neurosurgical patients. in Nutrition in Critical Care. Cambridge University Press, pp. 117-134. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139342452.013
Dickerson R, Faber P. Nutritional support of critically ill neurosurgical patients. In Nutrition in Critical Care. Cambridge University Press. 2014. p. 117-134 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139342452.013
Dickerson, Roland ; Faber, Peter. / Nutritional support of critically ill neurosurgical patients. Nutrition in Critical Care. Cambridge University Press, 2014. pp. 117-134
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