Obesity

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

One third of the US population is considered obese, but the health issue of obesity is rapidly extending to a global epidemic. Thus, it is inevitable that acute care clinicians are to be involved in the metabolic management of hospitalized patients with obesity. Obesity compounds the metabolic and inflammatory response to critical illness and increases the risk of complications of overfeeding such as hyperglycemia, hypercapnia, and hepatic steatosis. The metabolic management of surgical patients with obesity is uniquely different from that of the nonobese patient. The scientific evidence for the use of hypocaloric, high-protein parenteral or enteral nutrition as well as practical techniques for delivering, managing, and monitoring this therapy is reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSurgical Metabolism
Subtitle of host publicationThe Metabolic Care of the Surgical Patient
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages127-146
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781493911219
ISBN (Print)9781493911202
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Obesity
Hypercapnia
Parenteral Nutrition
Enteral Nutrition
Critical Illness
Hyperglycemia
Liver
Health
Population
Proteins
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dickerson, R. (2014). Obesity. In Surgical Metabolism: The Metabolic Care of the Surgical Patient (pp. 127-146). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1121-9_7

Obesity. / Dickerson, Roland.

Surgical Metabolism: The Metabolic Care of the Surgical Patient. Springer New York, 2014. p. 127-146.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dickerson, R 2014, Obesity. in Surgical Metabolism: The Metabolic Care of the Surgical Patient. Springer New York, pp. 127-146. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1121-9_7
Dickerson R. Obesity. In Surgical Metabolism: The Metabolic Care of the Surgical Patient. Springer New York. 2014. p. 127-146 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1121-9_7
Dickerson, Roland. / Obesity. Surgical Metabolism: The Metabolic Care of the Surgical Patient. Springer New York, 2014. pp. 127-146
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