Obesity and daytime pulse pressure are predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy in true normotensive individuals

Vasilios Kotsis, Stella Stabouli, Savvas Toumanidis, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Zoe Rizos, Christine Trakateli, Nikos Zakopoulos, Michael Sion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate predictors of left ventricular mass corrected for height2.7 (LVMI) and left ventricular hypertrophy in patients who were found to be normotensive with both office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements. Methods: A total of 805 consecutive patients were analyzed. All patients underwent office BP measurements, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, laboratory measurements for cardiovascular risk factors and echocardiography. Individuals with both office and ambulatory normotension were characterized as true normotensive. Results: LVMI was found to be 34.5 ± 10.9 g/m2.7 in normal-weight patients and 48.7 ± 13.0 g/m 2.7 in obese patients (P < 0.0001). LVMI was found to be 41.7 ± 10 g/m2.7 in overweight patients, significantly lower than the values of obese patients (P < 0.005) and higher than the values of normal-weight patients (P < 0.001). These results remained significant even after adjustment for age, sex, daytime and nighttime SBP, daytime and nighttime DBP, daytime and nighttime BP variability and daytime and nighttime pulse pressure (PP). In a multivariate analysis model, in which LVMI was the dependent variable and office SBP, office DBP, daytime and nighttime SBP and DBP, daytime and nighttime PPs and variabilities, day-night SBP ratio, fasting serum glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, age and BMI were inserted as independent variables with weighted least squares regression by sex, the predictors of LVMI were age, BMI and daytime PP (r2= 0.31). Left ventricular hypertrophy was 17.67 times more likely in obese patients as compared with normal-weight true normotensive individuals. Conclusion: Obesity may represent a significant cardiovascular risk factor even in normotensive individuals. Other predictors of LVMI were ageing and daytime PP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1065-1073
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Obesity
Blood Pressure
Weights and Measures
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Least-Squares Analysis
Echocardiography
Fasting
Reference Values
Triglycerides
Multivariate Analysis
Cholesterol
Glucose
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Obesity and daytime pulse pressure are predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy in true normotensive individuals. / Kotsis, Vasilios; Stabouli, Stella; Toumanidis, Savvas; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Rizos, Zoe; Trakateli, Christine; Zakopoulos, Nikos; Sion, Michael.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 28, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 1065-1073.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kotsis, Vasilios ; Stabouli, Stella ; Toumanidis, Savvas ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Rizos, Zoe ; Trakateli, Christine ; Zakopoulos, Nikos ; Sion, Michael. / Obesity and daytime pulse pressure are predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy in true normotensive individuals. In: Journal of Hypertension. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 1065-1073.
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T1 - Obesity and daytime pulse pressure are predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy in true normotensive individuals

AU - Kotsis, Vasilios

AU - Stabouli, Stella

AU - Toumanidis, Savvas

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Rizos, Zoe

AU - Trakateli, Christine

AU - Zakopoulos, Nikos

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AB - Objective: To investigate predictors of left ventricular mass corrected for height2.7 (LVMI) and left ventricular hypertrophy in patients who were found to be normotensive with both office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements. Methods: A total of 805 consecutive patients were analyzed. All patients underwent office BP measurements, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, laboratory measurements for cardiovascular risk factors and echocardiography. Individuals with both office and ambulatory normotension were characterized as true normotensive. Results: LVMI was found to be 34.5 ± 10.9 g/m2.7 in normal-weight patients and 48.7 ± 13.0 g/m 2.7 in obese patients (P < 0.0001). LVMI was found to be 41.7 ± 10 g/m2.7 in overweight patients, significantly lower than the values of obese patients (P < 0.005) and higher than the values of normal-weight patients (P < 0.001). These results remained significant even after adjustment for age, sex, daytime and nighttime SBP, daytime and nighttime DBP, daytime and nighttime BP variability and daytime and nighttime pulse pressure (PP). In a multivariate analysis model, in which LVMI was the dependent variable and office SBP, office DBP, daytime and nighttime SBP and DBP, daytime and nighttime PPs and variabilities, day-night SBP ratio, fasting serum glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, age and BMI were inserted as independent variables with weighted least squares regression by sex, the predictors of LVMI were age, BMI and daytime PP (r2= 0.31). Left ventricular hypertrophy was 17.67 times more likely in obese patients as compared with normal-weight true normotensive individuals. Conclusion: Obesity may represent a significant cardiovascular risk factor even in normotensive individuals. Other predictors of LVMI were ageing and daytime PP.

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