Obesity and risk for brain/CNS tumors, gliomas and meningiomas

A meta-analysis

Theodoros N. Sergentanis, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Christina Perlepe, Ioannis Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis Georgios Tzanninis, Ioannis N. Sergentanis, Theodora Psaltopoulou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design: Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Randomeffects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of betweenstudy heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results: A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13-1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03-1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05-1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28-1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22-2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Doseresponse meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion: Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumo1rs, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0136974
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Central Nervous System Neoplasms
Neurology
Meningioma
meta-analysis
Glioma
central nervous system
Meta-Analysis
Tumors
Brain
obesity
Obesity
brain
neoplasms
Regression analysis
dose response
regression analysis
Central Nervous System
Regression Analysis
case-control studies
cohort studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Sergentanis, T. N., Tsivgoulis, G., Perlepe, C., Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, I., Tzanninis, I. G., Sergentanis, I. N., & Psaltopoulou, T. (2015). Obesity and risk for brain/CNS tumors, gliomas and meningiomas: A meta-analysis. PLoS One, 10(9), [e0136974]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136974

Obesity and risk for brain/CNS tumors, gliomas and meningiomas : A meta-analysis. / Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Perlepe, Christina; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis Georgios; Sergentanis, Ioannis N.; Psaltopoulou, Theodora.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 9, e0136974, 02.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sergentanis, TN, Tsivgoulis, G, Perlepe, C, Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, I, Tzanninis, IG, Sergentanis, IN & Psaltopoulou, T 2015, 'Obesity and risk for brain/CNS tumors, gliomas and meningiomas: A meta-analysis', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 9, e0136974. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136974
Sergentanis TN, Tsivgoulis G, Perlepe C, Ntanasis-Stathopoulos I, Tzanninis IG, Sergentanis IN et al. Obesity and risk for brain/CNS tumors, gliomas and meningiomas: A meta-analysis. PLoS One. 2015 Sep 2;10(9). e0136974. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136974
Sergentanis, Theodoros N. ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Perlepe, Christina ; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis ; Tzanninis, Ioannis Georgios ; Sergentanis, Ioannis N. ; Psaltopoulou, Theodora. / Obesity and risk for brain/CNS tumors, gliomas and meningiomas : A meta-analysis. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 9.
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abstract = "Objective: This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design: Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Randomeffects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of betweenstudy heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results: A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95{\%}CI: 1.03-1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95{\%}CI: 1.13-1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95{\%}CI: 1.03-1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95{\%}CI: 1.05-1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95{\%}CI: 1.28-1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95{\%}CI: 1.22-2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Doseresponse meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion: Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumo1rs, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males.",
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