Octreotide and potassium homeostasis

Rex O. Brown, Roland Dickerson, Jay F. Mouser, Emily B. Hak, J. Travis Methvin, Lawrence J. Hak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Somatostatin infusion causes hyperkalemia in healthy subjects and in some animal models. The purpose of this investigation was to determine what effect octreotide has on potassium homeostasis during serious illness and if there is a dose-response relationship. Sixty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats (185-225 g) were randomized to receive parenteral nutrition (PN) only, PN plus continuous infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or PN plus LPS plus octreotide 10, 100, or 1000 pg/kg/day for 48 hours. Before randomization all animals received isocaloric, isonitrogenous, isokalemic PN. A 24-hour urine was collected and a blood sample was taken at the end of the study immediately before euthanization. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test. Nonhemolyzed serum samples from 50 rats were available for study. Serum potassium concentrations were in the normal range for rats and did not differ significantly among the groups: 5.97 ± 0.86, 5.96 ± 1.58, 5.78 ± 1.48, 5.79 ± 1.67, 5.35 ± 0.78 mEq/L, respectively. No differences among groups were found for fractional excretion of potassium or serum creatinine concentration. Octreotide administration in escalating dosages does not cause hyperkalemia in endotoxemic rats given intravenous potassium at a constant rate by PN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-560
Number of pages5
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume17
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1997

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Octreotide
Parenteral Nutrition
Potassium
Homeostasis
Hyperkalemia
Lipopolysaccharides
Serum
Random Allocation
Somatostatin
Sprague Dawley Rats
Creatinine
Analysis of Variance
Healthy Volunteers
Reference Values
Animal Models
Urine
Escherichia coli

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Brown, R. O., Dickerson, R., Mouser, J. F., Hak, E. B., Methvin, J. T., & Hak, L. J. (1997). Octreotide and potassium homeostasis. Pharmacotherapy, 17(3), 556-560.

Octreotide and potassium homeostasis. / Brown, Rex O.; Dickerson, Roland; Mouser, Jay F.; Hak, Emily B.; Methvin, J. Travis; Hak, Lawrence J.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 17, No. 3, 05.1997, p. 556-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, RO, Dickerson, R, Mouser, JF, Hak, EB, Methvin, JT & Hak, LJ 1997, 'Octreotide and potassium homeostasis', Pharmacotherapy, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 556-560.
Brown RO, Dickerson R, Mouser JF, Hak EB, Methvin JT, Hak LJ. Octreotide and potassium homeostasis. Pharmacotherapy. 1997 May;17(3):556-560.
Brown, Rex O. ; Dickerson, Roland ; Mouser, Jay F. ; Hak, Emily B. ; Methvin, J. Travis ; Hak, Lawrence J. / Octreotide and potassium homeostasis. In: Pharmacotherapy. 1997 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 556-560.
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