Octreotide enhances positive calcium balance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

D. F. Nutting, E. A. Schriock, G. M.A. Palmieri, J. B. Bittle, B. J. Elmendorf, L. H. Horner, M. C. Edwards, J. W. Griffin, H. S. Sacks, Tulio Bertorini

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Abstract

Although receptors for somatostatin are found in bone cells, the effect of somatostatin analogs on calcium metabolism is unknown. The authors studied, in a metabolic ward, the effect of octreotide (a long-acting somatostatin analog) and a placebo in two 6-day calcium balance periods in 8 children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. As expected, octreotide (2 μg/kg, subcutaneously, every 8 hours) reduced serum growth hormone and somatomedin (IGF-1) to levels found in growth hormone deficiency. Octreotide enhanced calcium retention by 30% (96 mg daily [P < 0.04]) in 7 boys for whom complete data (diet, urine, and fecal calcium) were available. In 6 children with urinary calcium excretion (U(Ca)) greater than 50 mg daily, octreotide markedly lowered U(Ca), from 114 ± 23 mg daily to 61 ± 9 mg daily (P < 0.03). Calcium retention occurred in patients with or without initial hypercalciuria, but the higher the basal U(Ca), the greater was the inhibition by octreotide (r = 0.79; P < 0.03). Inactive, nonambulatory patients had a more pronounced response of U(Ca) to octreotide (P < 0.02). Octreotide caused a mild, nonsignificant reduction in fecal calcium, with no major changes in serum calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, urinary excretion of sodium and potassium, or in creatinine clearance. Based on the current observations and the presence of receptors for somatostatin in bone cells, this hormone may have, at least on a short-term basis, an anabolic effect on calcium, perhaps favoring its deposition in bone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-98
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume310
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Octreotide
Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Calcium
Somatostatin Receptors
Bone and Bones
Growth Hormone
Hypercalciuria
Anabolic Agents
Somatostatin-Secreting Cells
Somatomedins
Somatostatin
Parathyroid Hormone
Serum
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Phosphorus
Creatinine
Potassium
Sodium
Placebos
Urine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nutting, D. F., Schriock, E. A., Palmieri, G. M. A., Bittle, J. B., Elmendorf, B. J., Horner, L. H., ... Bertorini, T. (1995). Octreotide enhances positive calcium balance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 310(3), 91-98.

Octreotide enhances positive calcium balance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. / Nutting, D. F.; Schriock, E. A.; Palmieri, G. M.A.; Bittle, J. B.; Elmendorf, B. J.; Horner, L. H.; Edwards, M. C.; Griffin, J. W.; Sacks, H. S.; Bertorini, Tulio.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 310, No. 3, 01.01.1995, p. 91-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nutting, DF, Schriock, EA, Palmieri, GMA, Bittle, JB, Elmendorf, BJ, Horner, LH, Edwards, MC, Griffin, JW, Sacks, HS & Bertorini, T 1995, 'Octreotide enhances positive calcium balance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy', American Journal of the Medical Sciences, vol. 310, no. 3, pp. 91-98.
Nutting DF, Schriock EA, Palmieri GMA, Bittle JB, Elmendorf BJ, Horner LH et al. Octreotide enhances positive calcium balance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 1995 Jan 1;310(3):91-98.
Nutting, D. F. ; Schriock, E. A. ; Palmieri, G. M.A. ; Bittle, J. B. ; Elmendorf, B. J. ; Horner, L. H. ; Edwards, M. C. ; Griffin, J. W. ; Sacks, H. S. ; Bertorini, Tulio. / Octreotide enhances positive calcium balance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 1995 ; Vol. 310, No. 3. pp. 91-98.
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AU - Nutting, D. F.

AU - Schriock, E. A.

AU - Palmieri, G. M.A.

AU - Bittle, J. B.

AU - Elmendorf, B. J.

AU - Horner, L. H.

AU - Edwards, M. C.

AU - Griffin, J. W.

AU - Sacks, H. S.

AU - Bertorini, Tulio

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N2 - Although receptors for somatostatin are found in bone cells, the effect of somatostatin analogs on calcium metabolism is unknown. The authors studied, in a metabolic ward, the effect of octreotide (a long-acting somatostatin analog) and a placebo in two 6-day calcium balance periods in 8 children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. As expected, octreotide (2 μg/kg, subcutaneously, every 8 hours) reduced serum growth hormone and somatomedin (IGF-1) to levels found in growth hormone deficiency. Octreotide enhanced calcium retention by 30% (96 mg daily [P < 0.04]) in 7 boys for whom complete data (diet, urine, and fecal calcium) were available. In 6 children with urinary calcium excretion (U(Ca)) greater than 50 mg daily, octreotide markedly lowered U(Ca), from 114 ± 23 mg daily to 61 ± 9 mg daily (P < 0.03). Calcium retention occurred in patients with or without initial hypercalciuria, but the higher the basal U(Ca), the greater was the inhibition by octreotide (r = 0.79; P < 0.03). Inactive, nonambulatory patients had a more pronounced response of U(Ca) to octreotide (P < 0.02). Octreotide caused a mild, nonsignificant reduction in fecal calcium, with no major changes in serum calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, urinary excretion of sodium and potassium, or in creatinine clearance. Based on the current observations and the presence of receptors for somatostatin in bone cells, this hormone may have, at least on a short-term basis, an anabolic effect on calcium, perhaps favoring its deposition in bone.

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