Offer of a weight management program to overweight and obese weight-concerned smokers improves tobacco dependence treatment outcomes

Sharhonda J. Love, Christine E. Sheffer, Zoran Bursac, T. Elaine Prewitt, Rebecca Krukowski, Delia Smith West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Weight concern is a common and significant barrier to abstinence for many smokers. This quasi-experimental pilot study used multivariate logistic regression to examine the effects of offering a weight management treatment program on tobacco dependence treatment outcomes. Age, gender, ethnicity, educational level, nicotine dependence level, body mass index, and concern about weight gain were entered as factors/covariates to account for differences between groups. Offering a weight management program increased attendance at the first scheduled contact (88.1% vs. 71.6%; OR = 2.93; p =.029) and increased 6-month abstinence (21.4% vs. 10.1%; OR = 2.42; p =.052). With factors and covariates included in the multivariate models to account for group differences, those offered weight management were five times more likely to attend their first session (OR = 5.10; 95% CI 1.53-16.98; p =.008) and three times more likely to be abstinent 6 months after tobacco treatment (OR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.09-8.17; p =.033). Proactively informing weight-concerned, overweight/obese smokers about the availability of a weight management program as an incentive for completing treatment for tobacco dependence may improve tobacco treatment outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Tobacco Use Disorder
Weights and Measures
Tobacco
Weight Gain
Motivation
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Offer of a weight management program to overweight and obese weight-concerned smokers improves tobacco dependence treatment outcomes. / Love, Sharhonda J.; Sheffer, Christine E.; Bursac, Zoran; Prewitt, T. Elaine; Krukowski, Rebecca; West, Delia Smith.

In: American Journal on Addictions, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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