Ominous Consequences of Immunoglobulin Deposition

Alan Solomon, Deborah T. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immunoglobulins are essential for health. In the absence of these proteins, life-threatening illnesses often occur, as evidenced by the susceptibility of people with congenital or acquired immunoglobulin deficiencies to infection or neoplasia. On the other hand, a hyperabundance of immunoglobulins can also be harmful, especially when the antibodies are directed against self-antigens (i.e., autoantibodies) or have certain physicochemical or structural properties that render them pathogenic, resulting, for example, in an immune-complex disease or hyperviscosity syndrome. Even more striking is the clinical impact of immunoglobulin overproduction in patients with plasma-cell dyscrasias in which the protein is deposited in vital organs. These…

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1422-1423
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume329
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 4 1993

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Immunoglobulins
Immune Complex Diseases
Paraproteinemias
Autoantigens
Autoantibodies
Proteins
Antibodies
Health
Infection
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ominous Consequences of Immunoglobulin Deposition. / Solomon, Alan; Weiss, Deborah T.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 329, No. 19, 04.11.1993, p. 1422-1423.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Solomon, Alan ; Weiss, Deborah T. / Ominous Consequences of Immunoglobulin Deposition. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1993 ; Vol. 329, No. 19. pp. 1422-1423.
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