On-demand therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease

David C. Metz, John M. Inadomi, Colin Howden, Sander J.Veldhuyzen Van Zanten, Peter Bytzer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The following pages summarize the proceedings of a symposium held in May 2006 on the emerging role of on-demand therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Medical therapy for GERD has undergone significant change in recent years with the advent of effective, but expensive, antisecretory agents. On-demand (patient-driven) therapy is attractive to payers and patients, because it appears to be both cost-effective and convenient. Many individuals appear to accept occasional symptomatic breakthrough in exchange for personal control of their disease. On-demand therapy should be distinguished from intermittent therapy, which is either patient- or physician-driven, but which requires intermittent episodes of continuous therapy followed by discontinuation until symptoms recur. Proton pump inhibitors appear to be effective on-demand agents despite theoretical pharmacodynamic limitations for this class of drug. The available data support the use of on-demand therapy for GERD in uninvestigated reflux disease, nonerosive reflux disease, and possibly mild esophagitis as well. On-demand therapy should not be considered for patients with severe esophagitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-653
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Gastroesophageal Reflux
Esophagitis
Therapeutics
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

On-demand therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease. / Metz, David C.; Inadomi, John M.; Howden, Colin; Van Zanten, Sander J.Veldhuyzen; Bytzer, Peter.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 102, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 642-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Metz, David C. ; Inadomi, John M. ; Howden, Colin ; Van Zanten, Sander J.Veldhuyzen ; Bytzer, Peter. / On-demand therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2007 ; Vol. 102, No. 3. pp. 642-653.
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