On the formation of neuromata in the primtary olfactory projection

James E. Schwob, Steven Youngentob, Karina F. Meiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Olfactory axons have been shown to grow aberrantly and form dense collections of axons, termed neuromas, in the olfactory epithelium of rats in which the olfactory bulb was ablated. Likewise, in human olfactory mucosa, collections of neurites have been noted in a variety of disease states, including Alzheimer's disease. We report here an immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis of aberrant axonal growth in the rat olfactory mucosa induced by experimental lesion. In particular, we have used the monoclonal antibody 2G12, which binds to the phosphorylated form of GAP‐43, as an extremely sensitive marker for neuromatous axons, because it does not label neuronal cell bodies. In unilaterally bulbectomized rats, neuromas form in posterior olfactory epithelium on the operated side. Several lines of evidence, including serial section reconstruction, indicate that olfactory axons are induced to grow back into the epithelium at a distance from their point of origin as a consequence of bulbectomy, and are accompanied by glial cells from the olfactory nerve. Avulsion of a part of the olfactory nerve has similar effects as destruction of the olfactory bulb. Intraepithelial neuromas also develop in the olfactory mucosa of rats simultaneously exposed to methyl bromide gas and injected with 3‐methyl indole; this treatment severely damages the olfactory epithelium directly. Exposure to methyl bromide alone causes milder damage, and the neuromas that form are transient. The evidence indicates that neuromas form after the epithelium is directly damaged because axons are trapped in the epithelium. Both of the mechanisms identified here should be taken into account when considering the findings in the human olfactory mucosa. © Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-380
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume340
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Neuroma
Olfactory Mucosa
methyl bromide
Axons
Olfactory Nerve
Epithelium
Olfactory Bulb
Neurites
Neuroglia
Alzheimer Disease
Gases
Electrons
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

On the formation of neuromata in the primtary olfactory projection. / Schwob, James E.; Youngentob, Steven; Meiri, Karina F.

In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 340, No. 3, 01.01.1994, p. 361-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwob, James E. ; Youngentob, Steven ; Meiri, Karina F. / On the formation of neuromata in the primtary olfactory projection. In: Journal of Comparative Neurology. 1994 ; Vol. 340, No. 3. pp. 361-380.
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