On the relative merits of invasive and non-invasive pre-surgical brain mapping

New tools in ablative epilepsy surgery

Andrew Papanicolaou, Roozbeh Rezaie, Shalini Narayana, Asim Choudhri, Abbas-Babajani-Feremi, Frederick Boop, James Wheless

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cortical Stimulation Mapping (CSM) and the Wada procedure have long been considered the gold standard for localizing motor and language-related cortical areas and for determining the language and memory-dominant hemisphere, respectively. In recent years, however, non-invasive methods such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have emerged as promising alternatives to the aforementioned procedures, particularly in cases where the invasive localization of eloquent cortex has proven to be challenging. To illustrate this point, we will first introduce the evidence of the compatibility of invasive and non-invasive methods and subsequently outline the rationale and the conditions where the latter methods are applicable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-155
Number of pages3
JournalEpilepsy Research
Volume142
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Brain Mapping
Epilepsy
Language
Magnetoencephalography
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "On the relative merits of invasive and non-invasive pre-surgical brain mapping: New tools in ablative epilepsy surgery",
abstract = "Cortical Stimulation Mapping (CSM) and the Wada procedure have long been considered the gold standard for localizing motor and language-related cortical areas and for determining the language and memory-dominant hemisphere, respectively. In recent years, however, non-invasive methods such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have emerged as promising alternatives to the aforementioned procedures, particularly in cases where the invasive localization of eloquent cortex has proven to be challenging. To illustrate this point, we will first introduce the evidence of the compatibility of invasive and non-invasive methods and subsequently outline the rationale and the conditions where the latter methods are applicable.",
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AU - Papanicolaou, Andrew

AU - Rezaie, Roozbeh

AU - Narayana, Shalini

AU - Choudhri, Asim

AU - Abbas-Babajani-Feremi,

AU - Boop, Frederick

AU - Wheless, James

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